Cindy Ruch
where are you from? I am from Germany, I grew up near the Black Forest.
where are you right now? In Barcelona, all through this summer, to write and take photos and to soak up the city’s beauty.
where do you want to be? By the sea with my tent, friends and my camera. 
blog // website // facebook
ZoomInfo
Cindy Ruch
where are you from? I am from Germany, I grew up near the Black Forest.
where are you right now? In Barcelona, all through this summer, to write and take photos and to soak up the city’s beauty.
where do you want to be? By the sea with my tent, friends and my camera. 
blog // website // facebook
ZoomInfo
Cindy Ruch
where are you from? I am from Germany, I grew up near the Black Forest.
where are you right now? In Barcelona, all through this summer, to write and take photos and to soak up the city’s beauty.
where do you want to be? By the sea with my tent, friends and my camera. 
blog // website // facebook
ZoomInfo
Cindy Ruch
where are you from? I am from Germany, I grew up near the Black Forest.
where are you right now? In Barcelona, all through this summer, to write and take photos and to soak up the city’s beauty.
where do you want to be? By the sea with my tent, friends and my camera. 
blog // website // facebook
ZoomInfo
Cindy Ruch
where are you from? I am from Germany, I grew up near the Black Forest.
where are you right now? In Barcelona, all through this summer, to write and take photos and to soak up the city’s beauty.
where do you want to be? By the sea with my tent, friends and my camera. 
blog // website // facebook
ZoomInfo
Cindy Ruch
where are you from? I am from Germany, I grew up near the Black Forest.
where are you right now? In Barcelona, all through this summer, to write and take photos and to soak up the city’s beauty.
where do you want to be? By the sea with my tent, friends and my camera. 
blog // website // facebook
ZoomInfo
Cindy Ruch
where are you from? I am from Germany, I grew up near the Black Forest.
where are you right now? In Barcelona, all through this summer, to write and take photos and to soak up the city’s beauty.
where do you want to be? By the sea with my tent, friends and my camera. 
blog // website // facebook
ZoomInfo
Cindy Ruch
where are you from? I am from Germany, I grew up near the Black Forest.
where are you right now? In Barcelona, all through this summer, to write and take photos and to soak up the city’s beauty.
where do you want to be? By the sea with my tent, friends and my camera. 
blog // website // facebook
ZoomInfo

Cindy Ruch

where are you from? I am from Germany, I grew up near the Black Forest.

where are you right now? In Barcelona, all through this summer, to write and take photos and to soak up the city’s beauty.

where do you want to be? By the sea with my tent, friends and my camera. 

blog // website // facebook

Hannelore Commers
where are you from? I was born in 1996 in a small town in Belgium, called Malderen. It’s near Brussels.
where are you right now? I am in the big sea of freedom that a 17 years old holiday-enjoyer usually is in.
Right now, I am sitting in a small encampment me and my sister made with pillows and blankets, eating cherries and repeating endlessly how deeply we love summer.
where do you want to be? Everywhere and nowhere. I would like to be in an utopia where the sun is non stop-shining on your skin, where you can tame sadness through dancing and where grey thinking people are colored in pastel tints.
tumblr
ZoomInfo
Hannelore Commers
where are you from? I was born in 1996 in a small town in Belgium, called Malderen. It’s near Brussels.
where are you right now? I am in the big sea of freedom that a 17 years old holiday-enjoyer usually is in.
Right now, I am sitting in a small encampment me and my sister made with pillows and blankets, eating cherries and repeating endlessly how deeply we love summer.
where do you want to be? Everywhere and nowhere. I would like to be in an utopia where the sun is non stop-shining on your skin, where you can tame sadness through dancing and where grey thinking people are colored in pastel tints.
tumblr
ZoomInfo
Hannelore Commers
where are you from? I was born in 1996 in a small town in Belgium, called Malderen. It’s near Brussels.
where are you right now? I am in the big sea of freedom that a 17 years old holiday-enjoyer usually is in.
Right now, I am sitting in a small encampment me and my sister made with pillows and blankets, eating cherries and repeating endlessly how deeply we love summer.
where do you want to be? Everywhere and nowhere. I would like to be in an utopia where the sun is non stop-shining on your skin, where you can tame sadness through dancing and where grey thinking people are colored in pastel tints.
tumblr
ZoomInfo
Hannelore Commers
where are you from? I was born in 1996 in a small town in Belgium, called Malderen. It’s near Brussels.
where are you right now? I am in the big sea of freedom that a 17 years old holiday-enjoyer usually is in.
Right now, I am sitting in a small encampment me and my sister made with pillows and blankets, eating cherries and repeating endlessly how deeply we love summer.
where do you want to be? Everywhere and nowhere. I would like to be in an utopia where the sun is non stop-shining on your skin, where you can tame sadness through dancing and where grey thinking people are colored in pastel tints.
tumblr
ZoomInfo
Hannelore Commers
where are you from? I was born in 1996 in a small town in Belgium, called Malderen. It’s near Brussels.
where are you right now? I am in the big sea of freedom that a 17 years old holiday-enjoyer usually is in.
Right now, I am sitting in a small encampment me and my sister made with pillows and blankets, eating cherries and repeating endlessly how deeply we love summer.
where do you want to be? Everywhere and nowhere. I would like to be in an utopia where the sun is non stop-shining on your skin, where you can tame sadness through dancing and where grey thinking people are colored in pastel tints.
tumblr
ZoomInfo
Hannelore Commers
where are you from? I was born in 1996 in a small town in Belgium, called Malderen. It’s near Brussels.
where are you right now? I am in the big sea of freedom that a 17 years old holiday-enjoyer usually is in.
Right now, I am sitting in a small encampment me and my sister made with pillows and blankets, eating cherries and repeating endlessly how deeply we love summer.
where do you want to be? Everywhere and nowhere. I would like to be in an utopia where the sun is non stop-shining on your skin, where you can tame sadness through dancing and where grey thinking people are colored in pastel tints.
tumblr
ZoomInfo
Hannelore Commers
where are you from? I was born in 1996 in a small town in Belgium, called Malderen. It’s near Brussels.
where are you right now? I am in the big sea of freedom that a 17 years old holiday-enjoyer usually is in.
Right now, I am sitting in a small encampment me and my sister made with pillows and blankets, eating cherries and repeating endlessly how deeply we love summer.
where do you want to be? Everywhere and nowhere. I would like to be in an utopia where the sun is non stop-shining on your skin, where you can tame sadness through dancing and where grey thinking people are colored in pastel tints.
tumblr
ZoomInfo
Hannelore Commers
where are you from? I was born in 1996 in a small town in Belgium, called Malderen. It’s near Brussels.
where are you right now? I am in the big sea of freedom that a 17 years old holiday-enjoyer usually is in.
Right now, I am sitting in a small encampment me and my sister made with pillows and blankets, eating cherries and repeating endlessly how deeply we love summer.
where do you want to be? Everywhere and nowhere. I would like to be in an utopia where the sun is non stop-shining on your skin, where you can tame sadness through dancing and where grey thinking people are colored in pastel tints.
tumblr
ZoomInfo

Hannelore Commers

where are you from? I was born in 1996 in a small town in Belgium, called Malderen. It’s near Brussels.

where are you right now? I am in the big sea of freedom that a 17 years old holiday-enjoyer usually is in.

Right now, I am sitting in a small encampment me and my sister made with pillows and blankets, eating cherries and repeating endlessly how deeply we love summer.

where do you want to be? Everywhere and nowhere. I would like to be in an utopia where the sun is non stop-shining on your skin, where you can tame sadness through dancing and where grey thinking people are colored in pastel tints.

tumblr

Kyler Zeleny
Out West
where are you from? I grew up on a farm in the Canadian Prairies.
where are you right now? I am in Edmonton, Alberta right now sitting behind a desk.
where do you want to be? I want to be in many places right now, but none for very long.
when you were a kid, what did you want to be when you grew up? When I was growing up I wanted to be a leader—not so much an occupation as much as an attribute.
how did you first start getting into photography? I bought an early consumer model point and shoot. The memory card was 128mbs and was wildly expensive.
tell me more about the idea of being “unstuck in time” and why it interests you. 
I am very interested in the concept of nostalgia and how it functions for different groups of people. I myself am fascinated with previous decades and often feel that the present is nothing special, particularly when compared to the aesthetics and attitudes of the past. For a host of reasons rural communities tend to lag behind urban centers as forces of change or reactors to change. That being said, the aesthetics and attitudes I was interested in can be found in rural communities. Not to say they cannot exist in urban areas, just that they are more prevalent or ‘on the surface’ in rural communities. The images in the Out West project exemplify this, where all the images are from the present but seem reference the past.
how did Out West begin?
The original concept for Out West began when I was living in London and originally it was not intended as a book. I started to see a lot of emphasis being placed on ‘the urban’ in popular culture and academia. I felt that rural studies were lacking, possibly being undervalued as a redundant system. I also try to work off the belief that when everyone is looking at one thing (no matter the mechanism or approach), it is best to set one’s gaze upon something else.
who is the most interesting person you have met while exploring these communities?
I was photographing in a very barren town. I was on the main street when a man approached me on a bike. He was a retired schoolteacher who taught in the community and was now the presiding mayor. I looked around the ‘town’ and was surprised that it could still have a mayor as the town looked so empty. He was a fascinating man, who declined a photograph. He delivered to me a detailed history of the community, from its boom years to its falloff in the 1970s. Every small community has this type of man; he speaks of the past with conviction, and although he enjoys himself in the present, he yearns for the day of yesteryear.
what is the most interesting story you have been told while you were working on this project?

The Canadian Prairies are young and with youth comes innocence as well as naivety. One of the most interesting stories was told to me by a man of Metis decent. Metis people are one of the recognized aboriginal groups of Canada.  They are of mixed European and Aboriginal decent. And historically, because they are neither ‘full blood’ Aboriginal or European, they have lacked acceptance from either side. His name was Phil and he owned a pawnshop. He told me how difficult it was to be Metis in an Aboriginal school system. The difficulty being that in this system both the establishment and your peers look down upon you with content.

was there an image that you didn’t take, but wish you did? a photograph that got away?

Images always get away. Our eye can see so much faster than we can react. There was one image that I was too slow to get; it existed for only half a second. It was of a woman walking down the center of a wide main street with the sun in her eyes, she was trying to shield her eyes from the sun but it looks more like she was in panic than anything else. I find it hard to describe, but I think it was a magical moment. Even if I was quick enough for the image I think it would have been a wash. It was likely an image for the mind and not the camera.

what has been the most surreal moment of your life this far?

I used to be a ‘volunteer’ firefighter and on one call I had to give CPR to an individual who was in a shootout with police.

in your opinion, what is the most interesting thing about you?

I feel like any answer I give will boarder on being narcissistic. But if I had to answer the question I think what I value most, is my ability to embrace a balance of both rural and urban living with neither in its totality. The lack of real space in urban centers drives me to rural areas and the general bore of rural areas drives me back to urban centers.
website // tumblr 
Out West is a book available for purchase now through The Velvet Cell.
ZoomInfo
Kyler Zeleny
Out West
where are you from? I grew up on a farm in the Canadian Prairies.
where are you right now? I am in Edmonton, Alberta right now sitting behind a desk.
where do you want to be? I want to be in many places right now, but none for very long.
when you were a kid, what did you want to be when you grew up? When I was growing up I wanted to be a leader—not so much an occupation as much as an attribute.
how did you first start getting into photography? I bought an early consumer model point and shoot. The memory card was 128mbs and was wildly expensive.
tell me more about the idea of being “unstuck in time” and why it interests you. 
I am very interested in the concept of nostalgia and how it functions for different groups of people. I myself am fascinated with previous decades and often feel that the present is nothing special, particularly when compared to the aesthetics and attitudes of the past. For a host of reasons rural communities tend to lag behind urban centers as forces of change or reactors to change. That being said, the aesthetics and attitudes I was interested in can be found in rural communities. Not to say they cannot exist in urban areas, just that they are more prevalent or ‘on the surface’ in rural communities. The images in the Out West project exemplify this, where all the images are from the present but seem reference the past.
how did Out West begin?
The original concept for Out West began when I was living in London and originally it was not intended as a book. I started to see a lot of emphasis being placed on ‘the urban’ in popular culture and academia. I felt that rural studies were lacking, possibly being undervalued as a redundant system. I also try to work off the belief that when everyone is looking at one thing (no matter the mechanism or approach), it is best to set one’s gaze upon something else.
who is the most interesting person you have met while exploring these communities?
I was photographing in a very barren town. I was on the main street when a man approached me on a bike. He was a retired schoolteacher who taught in the community and was now the presiding mayor. I looked around the ‘town’ and was surprised that it could still have a mayor as the town looked so empty. He was a fascinating man, who declined a photograph. He delivered to me a detailed history of the community, from its boom years to its falloff in the 1970s. Every small community has this type of man; he speaks of the past with conviction, and although he enjoys himself in the present, he yearns for the day of yesteryear.
what is the most interesting story you have been told while you were working on this project?

The Canadian Prairies are young and with youth comes innocence as well as naivety. One of the most interesting stories was told to me by a man of Metis decent. Metis people are one of the recognized aboriginal groups of Canada.  They are of mixed European and Aboriginal decent. And historically, because they are neither ‘full blood’ Aboriginal or European, they have lacked acceptance from either side. His name was Phil and he owned a pawnshop. He told me how difficult it was to be Metis in an Aboriginal school system. The difficulty being that in this system both the establishment and your peers look down upon you with content.

was there an image that you didn’t take, but wish you did? a photograph that got away?

Images always get away. Our eye can see so much faster than we can react. There was one image that I was too slow to get; it existed for only half a second. It was of a woman walking down the center of a wide main street with the sun in her eyes, she was trying to shield her eyes from the sun but it looks more like she was in panic than anything else. I find it hard to describe, but I think it was a magical moment. Even if I was quick enough for the image I think it would have been a wash. It was likely an image for the mind and not the camera.

what has been the most surreal moment of your life this far?

I used to be a ‘volunteer’ firefighter and on one call I had to give CPR to an individual who was in a shootout with police.

in your opinion, what is the most interesting thing about you?

I feel like any answer I give will boarder on being narcissistic. But if I had to answer the question I think what I value most, is my ability to embrace a balance of both rural and urban living with neither in its totality. The lack of real space in urban centers drives me to rural areas and the general bore of rural areas drives me back to urban centers.
website // tumblr 
Out West is a book available for purchase now through The Velvet Cell.
ZoomInfo
Kyler Zeleny
Out West
where are you from? I grew up on a farm in the Canadian Prairies.
where are you right now? I am in Edmonton, Alberta right now sitting behind a desk.
where do you want to be? I want to be in many places right now, but none for very long.
when you were a kid, what did you want to be when you grew up? When I was growing up I wanted to be a leader—not so much an occupation as much as an attribute.
how did you first start getting into photography? I bought an early consumer model point and shoot. The memory card was 128mbs and was wildly expensive.
tell me more about the idea of being “unstuck in time” and why it interests you. 
I am very interested in the concept of nostalgia and how it functions for different groups of people. I myself am fascinated with previous decades and often feel that the present is nothing special, particularly when compared to the aesthetics and attitudes of the past. For a host of reasons rural communities tend to lag behind urban centers as forces of change or reactors to change. That being said, the aesthetics and attitudes I was interested in can be found in rural communities. Not to say they cannot exist in urban areas, just that they are more prevalent or ‘on the surface’ in rural communities. The images in the Out West project exemplify this, where all the images are from the present but seem reference the past.
how did Out West begin?
The original concept for Out West began when I was living in London and originally it was not intended as a book. I started to see a lot of emphasis being placed on ‘the urban’ in popular culture and academia. I felt that rural studies were lacking, possibly being undervalued as a redundant system. I also try to work off the belief that when everyone is looking at one thing (no matter the mechanism or approach), it is best to set one’s gaze upon something else.
who is the most interesting person you have met while exploring these communities?
I was photographing in a very barren town. I was on the main street when a man approached me on a bike. He was a retired schoolteacher who taught in the community and was now the presiding mayor. I looked around the ‘town’ and was surprised that it could still have a mayor as the town looked so empty. He was a fascinating man, who declined a photograph. He delivered to me a detailed history of the community, from its boom years to its falloff in the 1970s. Every small community has this type of man; he speaks of the past with conviction, and although he enjoys himself in the present, he yearns for the day of yesteryear.
what is the most interesting story you have been told while you were working on this project?

The Canadian Prairies are young and with youth comes innocence as well as naivety. One of the most interesting stories was told to me by a man of Metis decent. Metis people are one of the recognized aboriginal groups of Canada.  They are of mixed European and Aboriginal decent. And historically, because they are neither ‘full blood’ Aboriginal or European, they have lacked acceptance from either side. His name was Phil and he owned a pawnshop. He told me how difficult it was to be Metis in an Aboriginal school system. The difficulty being that in this system both the establishment and your peers look down upon you with content.

was there an image that you didn’t take, but wish you did? a photograph that got away?

Images always get away. Our eye can see so much faster than we can react. There was one image that I was too slow to get; it existed for only half a second. It was of a woman walking down the center of a wide main street with the sun in her eyes, she was trying to shield her eyes from the sun but it looks more like she was in panic than anything else. I find it hard to describe, but I think it was a magical moment. Even if I was quick enough for the image I think it would have been a wash. It was likely an image for the mind and not the camera.

what has been the most surreal moment of your life this far?

I used to be a ‘volunteer’ firefighter and on one call I had to give CPR to an individual who was in a shootout with police.

in your opinion, what is the most interesting thing about you?

I feel like any answer I give will boarder on being narcissistic. But if I had to answer the question I think what I value most, is my ability to embrace a balance of both rural and urban living with neither in its totality. The lack of real space in urban centers drives me to rural areas and the general bore of rural areas drives me back to urban centers.
website // tumblr 
Out West is a book available for purchase now through The Velvet Cell.
ZoomInfo
Kyler Zeleny
Out West
where are you from? I grew up on a farm in the Canadian Prairies.
where are you right now? I am in Edmonton, Alberta right now sitting behind a desk.
where do you want to be? I want to be in many places right now, but none for very long.
when you were a kid, what did you want to be when you grew up? When I was growing up I wanted to be a leader—not so much an occupation as much as an attribute.
how did you first start getting into photography? I bought an early consumer model point and shoot. The memory card was 128mbs and was wildly expensive.
tell me more about the idea of being “unstuck in time” and why it interests you. 
I am very interested in the concept of nostalgia and how it functions for different groups of people. I myself am fascinated with previous decades and often feel that the present is nothing special, particularly when compared to the aesthetics and attitudes of the past. For a host of reasons rural communities tend to lag behind urban centers as forces of change or reactors to change. That being said, the aesthetics and attitudes I was interested in can be found in rural communities. Not to say they cannot exist in urban areas, just that they are more prevalent or ‘on the surface’ in rural communities. The images in the Out West project exemplify this, where all the images are from the present but seem reference the past.
how did Out West begin?
The original concept for Out West began when I was living in London and originally it was not intended as a book. I started to see a lot of emphasis being placed on ‘the urban’ in popular culture and academia. I felt that rural studies were lacking, possibly being undervalued as a redundant system. I also try to work off the belief that when everyone is looking at one thing (no matter the mechanism or approach), it is best to set one’s gaze upon something else.
who is the most interesting person you have met while exploring these communities?
I was photographing in a very barren town. I was on the main street when a man approached me on a bike. He was a retired schoolteacher who taught in the community and was now the presiding mayor. I looked around the ‘town’ and was surprised that it could still have a mayor as the town looked so empty. He was a fascinating man, who declined a photograph. He delivered to me a detailed history of the community, from its boom years to its falloff in the 1970s. Every small community has this type of man; he speaks of the past with conviction, and although he enjoys himself in the present, he yearns for the day of yesteryear.
what is the most interesting story you have been told while you were working on this project?

The Canadian Prairies are young and with youth comes innocence as well as naivety. One of the most interesting stories was told to me by a man of Metis decent. Metis people are one of the recognized aboriginal groups of Canada.  They are of mixed European and Aboriginal decent. And historically, because they are neither ‘full blood’ Aboriginal or European, they have lacked acceptance from either side. His name was Phil and he owned a pawnshop. He told me how difficult it was to be Metis in an Aboriginal school system. The difficulty being that in this system both the establishment and your peers look down upon you with content.

was there an image that you didn’t take, but wish you did? a photograph that got away?

Images always get away. Our eye can see so much faster than we can react. There was one image that I was too slow to get; it existed for only half a second. It was of a woman walking down the center of a wide main street with the sun in her eyes, she was trying to shield her eyes from the sun but it looks more like she was in panic than anything else. I find it hard to describe, but I think it was a magical moment. Even if I was quick enough for the image I think it would have been a wash. It was likely an image for the mind and not the camera.

what has been the most surreal moment of your life this far?

I used to be a ‘volunteer’ firefighter and on one call I had to give CPR to an individual who was in a shootout with police.

in your opinion, what is the most interesting thing about you?

I feel like any answer I give will boarder on being narcissistic. But if I had to answer the question I think what I value most, is my ability to embrace a balance of both rural and urban living with neither in its totality. The lack of real space in urban centers drives me to rural areas and the general bore of rural areas drives me back to urban centers.
website // tumblr 
Out West is a book available for purchase now through The Velvet Cell.
ZoomInfo
Kyler Zeleny
Out West
where are you from? I grew up on a farm in the Canadian Prairies.
where are you right now? I am in Edmonton, Alberta right now sitting behind a desk.
where do you want to be? I want to be in many places right now, but none for very long.
when you were a kid, what did you want to be when you grew up? When I was growing up I wanted to be a leader—not so much an occupation as much as an attribute.
how did you first start getting into photography? I bought an early consumer model point and shoot. The memory card was 128mbs and was wildly expensive.
tell me more about the idea of being “unstuck in time” and why it interests you. 
I am very interested in the concept of nostalgia and how it functions for different groups of people. I myself am fascinated with previous decades and often feel that the present is nothing special, particularly when compared to the aesthetics and attitudes of the past. For a host of reasons rural communities tend to lag behind urban centers as forces of change or reactors to change. That being said, the aesthetics and attitudes I was interested in can be found in rural communities. Not to say they cannot exist in urban areas, just that they are more prevalent or ‘on the surface’ in rural communities. The images in the Out West project exemplify this, where all the images are from the present but seem reference the past.
how did Out West begin?
The original concept for Out West began when I was living in London and originally it was not intended as a book. I started to see a lot of emphasis being placed on ‘the urban’ in popular culture and academia. I felt that rural studies were lacking, possibly being undervalued as a redundant system. I also try to work off the belief that when everyone is looking at one thing (no matter the mechanism or approach), it is best to set one’s gaze upon something else.
who is the most interesting person you have met while exploring these communities?
I was photographing in a very barren town. I was on the main street when a man approached me on a bike. He was a retired schoolteacher who taught in the community and was now the presiding mayor. I looked around the ‘town’ and was surprised that it could still have a mayor as the town looked so empty. He was a fascinating man, who declined a photograph. He delivered to me a detailed history of the community, from its boom years to its falloff in the 1970s. Every small community has this type of man; he speaks of the past with conviction, and although he enjoys himself in the present, he yearns for the day of yesteryear.
what is the most interesting story you have been told while you were working on this project?

The Canadian Prairies are young and with youth comes innocence as well as naivety. One of the most interesting stories was told to me by a man of Metis decent. Metis people are one of the recognized aboriginal groups of Canada.  They are of mixed European and Aboriginal decent. And historically, because they are neither ‘full blood’ Aboriginal or European, they have lacked acceptance from either side. His name was Phil and he owned a pawnshop. He told me how difficult it was to be Metis in an Aboriginal school system. The difficulty being that in this system both the establishment and your peers look down upon you with content.

was there an image that you didn’t take, but wish you did? a photograph that got away?

Images always get away. Our eye can see so much faster than we can react. There was one image that I was too slow to get; it existed for only half a second. It was of a woman walking down the center of a wide main street with the sun in her eyes, she was trying to shield her eyes from the sun but it looks more like she was in panic than anything else. I find it hard to describe, but I think it was a magical moment. Even if I was quick enough for the image I think it would have been a wash. It was likely an image for the mind and not the camera.

what has been the most surreal moment of your life this far?

I used to be a ‘volunteer’ firefighter and on one call I had to give CPR to an individual who was in a shootout with police.

in your opinion, what is the most interesting thing about you?

I feel like any answer I give will boarder on being narcissistic. But if I had to answer the question I think what I value most, is my ability to embrace a balance of both rural and urban living with neither in its totality. The lack of real space in urban centers drives me to rural areas and the general bore of rural areas drives me back to urban centers.
website // tumblr 
Out West is a book available for purchase now through The Velvet Cell.
ZoomInfo
Kyler Zeleny
Out West
where are you from? I grew up on a farm in the Canadian Prairies.
where are you right now? I am in Edmonton, Alberta right now sitting behind a desk.
where do you want to be? I want to be in many places right now, but none for very long.
when you were a kid, what did you want to be when you grew up? When I was growing up I wanted to be a leader—not so much an occupation as much as an attribute.
how did you first start getting into photography? I bought an early consumer model point and shoot. The memory card was 128mbs and was wildly expensive.
tell me more about the idea of being “unstuck in time” and why it interests you. 
I am very interested in the concept of nostalgia and how it functions for different groups of people. I myself am fascinated with previous decades and often feel that the present is nothing special, particularly when compared to the aesthetics and attitudes of the past. For a host of reasons rural communities tend to lag behind urban centers as forces of change or reactors to change. That being said, the aesthetics and attitudes I was interested in can be found in rural communities. Not to say they cannot exist in urban areas, just that they are more prevalent or ‘on the surface’ in rural communities. The images in the Out West project exemplify this, where all the images are from the present but seem reference the past.
how did Out West begin?
The original concept for Out West began when I was living in London and originally it was not intended as a book. I started to see a lot of emphasis being placed on ‘the urban’ in popular culture and academia. I felt that rural studies were lacking, possibly being undervalued as a redundant system. I also try to work off the belief that when everyone is looking at one thing (no matter the mechanism or approach), it is best to set one’s gaze upon something else.
who is the most interesting person you have met while exploring these communities?
I was photographing in a very barren town. I was on the main street when a man approached me on a bike. He was a retired schoolteacher who taught in the community and was now the presiding mayor. I looked around the ‘town’ and was surprised that it could still have a mayor as the town looked so empty. He was a fascinating man, who declined a photograph. He delivered to me a detailed history of the community, from its boom years to its falloff in the 1970s. Every small community has this type of man; he speaks of the past with conviction, and although he enjoys himself in the present, he yearns for the day of yesteryear.
what is the most interesting story you have been told while you were working on this project?

The Canadian Prairies are young and with youth comes innocence as well as naivety. One of the most interesting stories was told to me by a man of Metis decent. Metis people are one of the recognized aboriginal groups of Canada.  They are of mixed European and Aboriginal decent. And historically, because they are neither ‘full blood’ Aboriginal or European, they have lacked acceptance from either side. His name was Phil and he owned a pawnshop. He told me how difficult it was to be Metis in an Aboriginal school system. The difficulty being that in this system both the establishment and your peers look down upon you with content.

was there an image that you didn’t take, but wish you did? a photograph that got away?

Images always get away. Our eye can see so much faster than we can react. There was one image that I was too slow to get; it existed for only half a second. It was of a woman walking down the center of a wide main street with the sun in her eyes, she was trying to shield her eyes from the sun but it looks more like she was in panic than anything else. I find it hard to describe, but I think it was a magical moment. Even if I was quick enough for the image I think it would have been a wash. It was likely an image for the mind and not the camera.

what has been the most surreal moment of your life this far?

I used to be a ‘volunteer’ firefighter and on one call I had to give CPR to an individual who was in a shootout with police.

in your opinion, what is the most interesting thing about you?

I feel like any answer I give will boarder on being narcissistic. But if I had to answer the question I think what I value most, is my ability to embrace a balance of both rural and urban living with neither in its totality. The lack of real space in urban centers drives me to rural areas and the general bore of rural areas drives me back to urban centers.
website // tumblr 
Out West is a book available for purchase now through The Velvet Cell.
ZoomInfo
Kyler Zeleny
Out West
where are you from? I grew up on a farm in the Canadian Prairies.
where are you right now? I am in Edmonton, Alberta right now sitting behind a desk.
where do you want to be? I want to be in many places right now, but none for very long.
when you were a kid, what did you want to be when you grew up? When I was growing up I wanted to be a leader—not so much an occupation as much as an attribute.
how did you first start getting into photography? I bought an early consumer model point and shoot. The memory card was 128mbs and was wildly expensive.
tell me more about the idea of being “unstuck in time” and why it interests you. 
I am very interested in the concept of nostalgia and how it functions for different groups of people. I myself am fascinated with previous decades and often feel that the present is nothing special, particularly when compared to the aesthetics and attitudes of the past. For a host of reasons rural communities tend to lag behind urban centers as forces of change or reactors to change. That being said, the aesthetics and attitudes I was interested in can be found in rural communities. Not to say they cannot exist in urban areas, just that they are more prevalent or ‘on the surface’ in rural communities. The images in the Out West project exemplify this, where all the images are from the present but seem reference the past.
how did Out West begin?
The original concept for Out West began when I was living in London and originally it was not intended as a book. I started to see a lot of emphasis being placed on ‘the urban’ in popular culture and academia. I felt that rural studies were lacking, possibly being undervalued as a redundant system. I also try to work off the belief that when everyone is looking at one thing (no matter the mechanism or approach), it is best to set one’s gaze upon something else.
who is the most interesting person you have met while exploring these communities?
I was photographing in a very barren town. I was on the main street when a man approached me on a bike. He was a retired schoolteacher who taught in the community and was now the presiding mayor. I looked around the ‘town’ and was surprised that it could still have a mayor as the town looked so empty. He was a fascinating man, who declined a photograph. He delivered to me a detailed history of the community, from its boom years to its falloff in the 1970s. Every small community has this type of man; he speaks of the past with conviction, and although he enjoys himself in the present, he yearns for the day of yesteryear.
what is the most interesting story you have been told while you were working on this project?

The Canadian Prairies are young and with youth comes innocence as well as naivety. One of the most interesting stories was told to me by a man of Metis decent. Metis people are one of the recognized aboriginal groups of Canada.  They are of mixed European and Aboriginal decent. And historically, because they are neither ‘full blood’ Aboriginal or European, they have lacked acceptance from either side. His name was Phil and he owned a pawnshop. He told me how difficult it was to be Metis in an Aboriginal school system. The difficulty being that in this system both the establishment and your peers look down upon you with content.

was there an image that you didn’t take, but wish you did? a photograph that got away?

Images always get away. Our eye can see so much faster than we can react. There was one image that I was too slow to get; it existed for only half a second. It was of a woman walking down the center of a wide main street with the sun in her eyes, she was trying to shield her eyes from the sun but it looks more like she was in panic than anything else. I find it hard to describe, but I think it was a magical moment. Even if I was quick enough for the image I think it would have been a wash. It was likely an image for the mind and not the camera.

what has been the most surreal moment of your life this far?

I used to be a ‘volunteer’ firefighter and on one call I had to give CPR to an individual who was in a shootout with police.

in your opinion, what is the most interesting thing about you?

I feel like any answer I give will boarder on being narcissistic. But if I had to answer the question I think what I value most, is my ability to embrace a balance of both rural and urban living with neither in its totality. The lack of real space in urban centers drives me to rural areas and the general bore of rural areas drives me back to urban centers.
website // tumblr 
Out West is a book available for purchase now through The Velvet Cell.
ZoomInfo

Kyler Zeleny

Out West

where are you from? I grew up on a farm in the Canadian Prairies.

where are you right now? I am in Edmonton, Alberta right now sitting behind a desk.

where do you want to be? I want to be in many places right now, but none for very long.

when you were a kid, what did you want to be when you grew up? When I was growing up I wanted to be a leader—not so much an occupation as much as an attribute.

how did you first start getting into photography? I bought an early consumer model point and shoot. The memory card was 128mbs and was wildly expensive.

tell me more about the idea of being “unstuck in time” and why it interests you. 

I am very interested in the concept of nostalgia and how it functions for different groups of people. I myself am fascinated with previous decades and often feel that the present is nothing special, particularly when compared to the aesthetics and attitudes of the past. For a host of reasons rural communities tend to lag behind urban centers as forces of change or reactors to change. That being said, the aesthetics and attitudes I was interested in can be found in rural communities. Not to say they cannot exist in urban areas, just that they are more prevalent or ‘on the surface’ in rural communities. The images in the Out West project exemplify this, where all the images are from the present but seem reference the past.

how did Out West begin?

The original concept for Out West began when I was living in London and originally it was not intended as a book. I started to see a lot of emphasis being placed on ‘the urban’ in popular culture and academia. I felt that rural studies were lacking, possibly being undervalued as a redundant system. I also try to work off the belief that when everyone is looking at one thing (no matter the mechanism or approach), it is best to set one’s gaze upon something else.

who is the most interesting person you have met while exploring these communities?

I was photographing in a very barren town. I was on the main street when a man approached me on a bike. He was a retired schoolteacher who taught in the community and was now the presiding mayor. I looked around the ‘town’ and was surprised that it could still have a mayor as the town looked so empty. He was a fascinating man, who declined a photograph. He delivered to me a detailed history of the community, from its boom years to its falloff in the 1970s. Every small community has this type of man; he speaks of the past with conviction, and although he enjoys himself in the present, he yearns for the day of yesteryear.

what is the most interesting story you have been told while you were working on this project?

The Canadian Prairies are young and with youth comes innocence as well as naivety. One of the most interesting stories was told to me by a man of Metis decent. Metis people are one of the recognized aboriginal groups of Canada.  They are of mixed European and Aboriginal decent. And historically, because they are neither ‘full blood’ Aboriginal or European, they have lacked acceptance from either side. His name was Phil and he owned a pawnshop. He told me how difficult it was to be Metis in an Aboriginal school system. The difficulty being that in this system both the establishment and your peers look down upon you with content.

was there an image that you didn’t take, but wish you did? a photograph that got away?

Images always get away. Our eye can see so much faster than we can react. There was one image that I was too slow to get; it existed for only half a second. It was of a woman walking down the center of a wide main street with the sun in her eyes, she was trying to shield her eyes from the sun but it looks more like she was in panic than anything else. I find it hard to describe, but I think it was a magical moment. Even if I was quick enough for the image I think it would have been a wash. It was likely an image for the mind and not the camera.

what has been the most surreal moment of your life this far?

I used to be a ‘volunteer’ firefighter and on one call I had to give CPR to an individual who was in a shootout with police.

in your opinion, what is the most interesting thing about you?

I feel like any answer I give will boarder on being narcissistic. But if I had to answer the question I think what I value most, is my ability to embrace a balance of both rural and urban living with neither in its totality. The lack of real space in urban centers drives me to rural areas and the general bore of rural areas drives me back to urban centers.

website // tumblr

Out West is a book available for purchase now through The Velvet Cell.

Chad Siddall
where are you from? I am from a small town named Woodstock, Ontario for reference that is between London and Toronto.
where are you right now? Well I just got back after 14 months in Australia which was absolutely life changing and an amazing experience to say the least so I’m just kickin’ it back in my home town getting everything sorted to move to Toronto to pursue my love of Photography. 
where do you want to be?  I want to have my own studio apartment overlooking Toronto with a Cat named Oscar hahah but seriously, I want my business to be up and running and just genuinely happy. That’s where I think I’d like to be. 
cargo // flickr
ZoomInfo
Chad Siddall
where are you from? I am from a small town named Woodstock, Ontario for reference that is between London and Toronto.
where are you right now? Well I just got back after 14 months in Australia which was absolutely life changing and an amazing experience to say the least so I’m just kickin’ it back in my home town getting everything sorted to move to Toronto to pursue my love of Photography. 
where do you want to be?  I want to have my own studio apartment overlooking Toronto with a Cat named Oscar hahah but seriously, I want my business to be up and running and just genuinely happy. That’s where I think I’d like to be. 
cargo // flickr
ZoomInfo
Chad Siddall
where are you from? I am from a small town named Woodstock, Ontario for reference that is between London and Toronto.
where are you right now? Well I just got back after 14 months in Australia which was absolutely life changing and an amazing experience to say the least so I’m just kickin’ it back in my home town getting everything sorted to move to Toronto to pursue my love of Photography. 
where do you want to be?  I want to have my own studio apartment overlooking Toronto with a Cat named Oscar hahah but seriously, I want my business to be up and running and just genuinely happy. That’s where I think I’d like to be. 
cargo // flickr
ZoomInfo
Chad Siddall
where are you from? I am from a small town named Woodstock, Ontario for reference that is between London and Toronto.
where are you right now? Well I just got back after 14 months in Australia which was absolutely life changing and an amazing experience to say the least so I’m just kickin’ it back in my home town getting everything sorted to move to Toronto to pursue my love of Photography. 
where do you want to be?  I want to have my own studio apartment overlooking Toronto with a Cat named Oscar hahah but seriously, I want my business to be up and running and just genuinely happy. That’s where I think I’d like to be. 
cargo // flickr
ZoomInfo
Chad Siddall
where are you from? I am from a small town named Woodstock, Ontario for reference that is between London and Toronto.
where are you right now? Well I just got back after 14 months in Australia which was absolutely life changing and an amazing experience to say the least so I’m just kickin’ it back in my home town getting everything sorted to move to Toronto to pursue my love of Photography. 
where do you want to be?  I want to have my own studio apartment overlooking Toronto with a Cat named Oscar hahah but seriously, I want my business to be up and running and just genuinely happy. That’s where I think I’d like to be. 
cargo // flickr
ZoomInfo
Chad Siddall
where are you from? I am from a small town named Woodstock, Ontario for reference that is between London and Toronto.
where are you right now? Well I just got back after 14 months in Australia which was absolutely life changing and an amazing experience to say the least so I’m just kickin’ it back in my home town getting everything sorted to move to Toronto to pursue my love of Photography. 
where do you want to be?  I want to have my own studio apartment overlooking Toronto with a Cat named Oscar hahah but seriously, I want my business to be up and running and just genuinely happy. That’s where I think I’d like to be. 
cargo // flickr
ZoomInfo
Chad Siddall
where are you from? I am from a small town named Woodstock, Ontario for reference that is between London and Toronto.
where are you right now? Well I just got back after 14 months in Australia which was absolutely life changing and an amazing experience to say the least so I’m just kickin’ it back in my home town getting everything sorted to move to Toronto to pursue my love of Photography. 
where do you want to be?  I want to have my own studio apartment overlooking Toronto with a Cat named Oscar hahah but seriously, I want my business to be up and running and just genuinely happy. That’s where I think I’d like to be. 
cargo // flickr
ZoomInfo

Chad Siddall

where are you from? I am from a small town named Woodstock, Ontario for reference that is between London and Toronto.

where are you right now? Well I just got back after 14 months in Australia which was absolutely life changing and an amazing experience to say the least so I’m just kickin’ it back in my home town getting everything sorted to move to Toronto to pursue my love of Photography. 

where do you want to be?  I want to have my own studio apartment overlooking Toronto with a Cat named Oscar hahah but seriously, I want my business to be up and running and just genuinely happy. That’s where I think I’d like to be. 

cargo // flickr

Analogue Blues
I met with this lovely photographer in one of the most unlikely places possible  - a Starbucks a couple blocks away from Grand Central right in the middle of the busy lunch hours. Sweet, soft-spoken, and humble, she was a pleasure to talk to. Keep reading to find out about lazy starfishes, the mystery in the identity, and haunting Jimmy Kimmel.

why Analogue Blues? how did that name come around?

I really like film photography. Being a college student, you’re not really drowning in money, and film is quite expensive - so the analogue part is because of my love for film, and the blues is because I don’t have enough money to shoot as much film as I would like to. 

how did you start out with photography? have you always done film?

I started out with digital at first, but I had my dad’s first film camera around, and I would play with that sometimes, and then I slowly got into it. 

what is it that you like about film?

I really like the grain, and I think that it feels very organic, and it just has a lot of surprises. 

what is your favourite thing to photograph? what are you drawn to?

I’m not quite sure yet. I’m doing a 52-week project, which I am about to end in a week or so, and I am using myself as a subject. But the thing is, I don’t like using myself, it’s more because I can’t find anyone to model, and my friends are kind of stiff. I do like the sky though. It changes every day, and I find it interesting.

why don’t you like taking photos of yourself?

I started out with conceptual work, and I thought that it would make me tap into my emotions. But I don’t think it did. Plus I cut my hair right now, and I like it when in photographs, hair flows. If I do portray myself, I cut out my head, or do a silhouette, or just don’t show my face in one way or another. I like having this mysterious person in my photographs.

what would your spirit animal be?

I was thinking about that today! I went to work, and I was looking at this starfish, and I just like how they’re so lazy, and they just float around. I would be a starfish.

if you were a ghost, who would you haunt?

I’m trying to think of comedians. They would make it really funny. Jimmy Kimmel.

what inspires you?

Tumblr. I’m getting into fashion photography because of it. Not the sharp shadows and the use of flash, but kind of a softer, more vintage feel. And music. My favourite bands are Phoenix, and The Killers. The Black Keys, Of Monsters and Men, that type of stuff.

what are you studying in college?

Medicine. As a kid, I knew what I wanted to do, but I didn’t know what exactly it was. I’ve always wanted to be a doctor. 

so in ten years, give or take, how do you see yourself? are you a doctor with a photography hobby?

Yes! That’s exactly how I see myself. I actually also want to use photographs as some sort of journalistic approach if I go to work or volunteer in other countries. But right now, taking all heavy sciences in college drew me to art, because it gives me a break from all the biology and the chemistry. 

what do you like most about yourself?


My quietness.

flickr // tumblr
ZoomInfo
Analogue Blues
I met with this lovely photographer in one of the most unlikely places possible  - a Starbucks a couple blocks away from Grand Central right in the middle of the busy lunch hours. Sweet, soft-spoken, and humble, she was a pleasure to talk to. Keep reading to find out about lazy starfishes, the mystery in the identity, and haunting Jimmy Kimmel.

why Analogue Blues? how did that name come around?

I really like film photography. Being a college student, you’re not really drowning in money, and film is quite expensive - so the analogue part is because of my love for film, and the blues is because I don’t have enough money to shoot as much film as I would like to. 

how did you start out with photography? have you always done film?

I started out with digital at first, but I had my dad’s first film camera around, and I would play with that sometimes, and then I slowly got into it. 

what is it that you like about film?

I really like the grain, and I think that it feels very organic, and it just has a lot of surprises. 

what is your favourite thing to photograph? what are you drawn to?

I’m not quite sure yet. I’m doing a 52-week project, which I am about to end in a week or so, and I am using myself as a subject. But the thing is, I don’t like using myself, it’s more because I can’t find anyone to model, and my friends are kind of stiff. I do like the sky though. It changes every day, and I find it interesting.

why don’t you like taking photos of yourself?

I started out with conceptual work, and I thought that it would make me tap into my emotions. But I don’t think it did. Plus I cut my hair right now, and I like it when in photographs, hair flows. If I do portray myself, I cut out my head, or do a silhouette, or just don’t show my face in one way or another. I like having this mysterious person in my photographs.

what would your spirit animal be?

I was thinking about that today! I went to work, and I was looking at this starfish, and I just like how they’re so lazy, and they just float around. I would be a starfish.

if you were a ghost, who would you haunt?

I’m trying to think of comedians. They would make it really funny. Jimmy Kimmel.

what inspires you?

Tumblr. I’m getting into fashion photography because of it. Not the sharp shadows and the use of flash, but kind of a softer, more vintage feel. And music. My favourite bands are Phoenix, and The Killers. The Black Keys, Of Monsters and Men, that type of stuff.

what are you studying in college?

Medicine. As a kid, I knew what I wanted to do, but I didn’t know what exactly it was. I’ve always wanted to be a doctor. 

so in ten years, give or take, how do you see yourself? are you a doctor with a photography hobby?

Yes! That’s exactly how I see myself. I actually also want to use photographs as some sort of journalistic approach if I go to work or volunteer in other countries. But right now, taking all heavy sciences in college drew me to art, because it gives me a break from all the biology and the chemistry. 

what do you like most about yourself?


My quietness.

flickr // tumblr
ZoomInfo
Analogue Blues
I met with this lovely photographer in one of the most unlikely places possible  - a Starbucks a couple blocks away from Grand Central right in the middle of the busy lunch hours. Sweet, soft-spoken, and humble, she was a pleasure to talk to. Keep reading to find out about lazy starfishes, the mystery in the identity, and haunting Jimmy Kimmel.

why Analogue Blues? how did that name come around?

I really like film photography. Being a college student, you’re not really drowning in money, and film is quite expensive - so the analogue part is because of my love for film, and the blues is because I don’t have enough money to shoot as much film as I would like to. 

how did you start out with photography? have you always done film?

I started out with digital at first, but I had my dad’s first film camera around, and I would play with that sometimes, and then I slowly got into it. 

what is it that you like about film?

I really like the grain, and I think that it feels very organic, and it just has a lot of surprises. 

what is your favourite thing to photograph? what are you drawn to?

I’m not quite sure yet. I’m doing a 52-week project, which I am about to end in a week or so, and I am using myself as a subject. But the thing is, I don’t like using myself, it’s more because I can’t find anyone to model, and my friends are kind of stiff. I do like the sky though. It changes every day, and I find it interesting.

why don’t you like taking photos of yourself?

I started out with conceptual work, and I thought that it would make me tap into my emotions. But I don’t think it did. Plus I cut my hair right now, and I like it when in photographs, hair flows. If I do portray myself, I cut out my head, or do a silhouette, or just don’t show my face in one way or another. I like having this mysterious person in my photographs.

what would your spirit animal be?

I was thinking about that today! I went to work, and I was looking at this starfish, and I just like how they’re so lazy, and they just float around. I would be a starfish.

if you were a ghost, who would you haunt?

I’m trying to think of comedians. They would make it really funny. Jimmy Kimmel.

what inspires you?

Tumblr. I’m getting into fashion photography because of it. Not the sharp shadows and the use of flash, but kind of a softer, more vintage feel. And music. My favourite bands are Phoenix, and The Killers. The Black Keys, Of Monsters and Men, that type of stuff.

what are you studying in college?

Medicine. As a kid, I knew what I wanted to do, but I didn’t know what exactly it was. I’ve always wanted to be a doctor. 

so in ten years, give or take, how do you see yourself? are you a doctor with a photography hobby?

Yes! That’s exactly how I see myself. I actually also want to use photographs as some sort of journalistic approach if I go to work or volunteer in other countries. But right now, taking all heavy sciences in college drew me to art, because it gives me a break from all the biology and the chemistry. 

what do you like most about yourself?


My quietness.

flickr // tumblr
ZoomInfo
Analogue Blues
I met with this lovely photographer in one of the most unlikely places possible  - a Starbucks a couple blocks away from Grand Central right in the middle of the busy lunch hours. Sweet, soft-spoken, and humble, she was a pleasure to talk to. Keep reading to find out about lazy starfishes, the mystery in the identity, and haunting Jimmy Kimmel.

why Analogue Blues? how did that name come around?

I really like film photography. Being a college student, you’re not really drowning in money, and film is quite expensive - so the analogue part is because of my love for film, and the blues is because I don’t have enough money to shoot as much film as I would like to. 

how did you start out with photography? have you always done film?

I started out with digital at first, but I had my dad’s first film camera around, and I would play with that sometimes, and then I slowly got into it. 

what is it that you like about film?

I really like the grain, and I think that it feels very organic, and it just has a lot of surprises. 

what is your favourite thing to photograph? what are you drawn to?

I’m not quite sure yet. I’m doing a 52-week project, which I am about to end in a week or so, and I am using myself as a subject. But the thing is, I don’t like using myself, it’s more because I can’t find anyone to model, and my friends are kind of stiff. I do like the sky though. It changes every day, and I find it interesting.

why don’t you like taking photos of yourself?

I started out with conceptual work, and I thought that it would make me tap into my emotions. But I don’t think it did. Plus I cut my hair right now, and I like it when in photographs, hair flows. If I do portray myself, I cut out my head, or do a silhouette, or just don’t show my face in one way or another. I like having this mysterious person in my photographs.

what would your spirit animal be?

I was thinking about that today! I went to work, and I was looking at this starfish, and I just like how they’re so lazy, and they just float around. I would be a starfish.

if you were a ghost, who would you haunt?

I’m trying to think of comedians. They would make it really funny. Jimmy Kimmel.

what inspires you?

Tumblr. I’m getting into fashion photography because of it. Not the sharp shadows and the use of flash, but kind of a softer, more vintage feel. And music. My favourite bands are Phoenix, and The Killers. The Black Keys, Of Monsters and Men, that type of stuff.

what are you studying in college?

Medicine. As a kid, I knew what I wanted to do, but I didn’t know what exactly it was. I’ve always wanted to be a doctor. 

so in ten years, give or take, how do you see yourself? are you a doctor with a photography hobby?

Yes! That’s exactly how I see myself. I actually also want to use photographs as some sort of journalistic approach if I go to work or volunteer in other countries. But right now, taking all heavy sciences in college drew me to art, because it gives me a break from all the biology and the chemistry. 

what do you like most about yourself?


My quietness.

flickr // tumblr
ZoomInfo
Analogue Blues
I met with this lovely photographer in one of the most unlikely places possible  - a Starbucks a couple blocks away from Grand Central right in the middle of the busy lunch hours. Sweet, soft-spoken, and humble, she was a pleasure to talk to. Keep reading to find out about lazy starfishes, the mystery in the identity, and haunting Jimmy Kimmel.

why Analogue Blues? how did that name come around?

I really like film photography. Being a college student, you’re not really drowning in money, and film is quite expensive - so the analogue part is because of my love for film, and the blues is because I don’t have enough money to shoot as much film as I would like to. 

how did you start out with photography? have you always done film?

I started out with digital at first, but I had my dad’s first film camera around, and I would play with that sometimes, and then I slowly got into it. 

what is it that you like about film?

I really like the grain, and I think that it feels very organic, and it just has a lot of surprises. 

what is your favourite thing to photograph? what are you drawn to?

I’m not quite sure yet. I’m doing a 52-week project, which I am about to end in a week or so, and I am using myself as a subject. But the thing is, I don’t like using myself, it’s more because I can’t find anyone to model, and my friends are kind of stiff. I do like the sky though. It changes every day, and I find it interesting.

why don’t you like taking photos of yourself?

I started out with conceptual work, and I thought that it would make me tap into my emotions. But I don’t think it did. Plus I cut my hair right now, and I like it when in photographs, hair flows. If I do portray myself, I cut out my head, or do a silhouette, or just don’t show my face in one way or another. I like having this mysterious person in my photographs.

what would your spirit animal be?

I was thinking about that today! I went to work, and I was looking at this starfish, and I just like how they’re so lazy, and they just float around. I would be a starfish.

if you were a ghost, who would you haunt?

I’m trying to think of comedians. They would make it really funny. Jimmy Kimmel.

what inspires you?

Tumblr. I’m getting into fashion photography because of it. Not the sharp shadows and the use of flash, but kind of a softer, more vintage feel. And music. My favourite bands are Phoenix, and The Killers. The Black Keys, Of Monsters and Men, that type of stuff.

what are you studying in college?

Medicine. As a kid, I knew what I wanted to do, but I didn’t know what exactly it was. I’ve always wanted to be a doctor. 

so in ten years, give or take, how do you see yourself? are you a doctor with a photography hobby?

Yes! That’s exactly how I see myself. I actually also want to use photographs as some sort of journalistic approach if I go to work or volunteer in other countries. But right now, taking all heavy sciences in college drew me to art, because it gives me a break from all the biology and the chemistry. 

what do you like most about yourself?


My quietness.

flickr // tumblr
ZoomInfo
Analogue Blues
I met with this lovely photographer in one of the most unlikely places possible  - a Starbucks a couple blocks away from Grand Central right in the middle of the busy lunch hours. Sweet, soft-spoken, and humble, she was a pleasure to talk to. Keep reading to find out about lazy starfishes, the mystery in the identity, and haunting Jimmy Kimmel.

why Analogue Blues? how did that name come around?

I really like film photography. Being a college student, you’re not really drowning in money, and film is quite expensive - so the analogue part is because of my love for film, and the blues is because I don’t have enough money to shoot as much film as I would like to. 

how did you start out with photography? have you always done film?

I started out with digital at first, but I had my dad’s first film camera around, and I would play with that sometimes, and then I slowly got into it. 

what is it that you like about film?

I really like the grain, and I think that it feels very organic, and it just has a lot of surprises. 

what is your favourite thing to photograph? what are you drawn to?

I’m not quite sure yet. I’m doing a 52-week project, which I am about to end in a week or so, and I am using myself as a subject. But the thing is, I don’t like using myself, it’s more because I can’t find anyone to model, and my friends are kind of stiff. I do like the sky though. It changes every day, and I find it interesting.

why don’t you like taking photos of yourself?

I started out with conceptual work, and I thought that it would make me tap into my emotions. But I don’t think it did. Plus I cut my hair right now, and I like it when in photographs, hair flows. If I do portray myself, I cut out my head, or do a silhouette, or just don’t show my face in one way or another. I like having this mysterious person in my photographs.

what would your spirit animal be?

I was thinking about that today! I went to work, and I was looking at this starfish, and I just like how they’re so lazy, and they just float around. I would be a starfish.

if you were a ghost, who would you haunt?

I’m trying to think of comedians. They would make it really funny. Jimmy Kimmel.

what inspires you?

Tumblr. I’m getting into fashion photography because of it. Not the sharp shadows and the use of flash, but kind of a softer, more vintage feel. And music. My favourite bands are Phoenix, and The Killers. The Black Keys, Of Monsters and Men, that type of stuff.

what are you studying in college?

Medicine. As a kid, I knew what I wanted to do, but I didn’t know what exactly it was. I’ve always wanted to be a doctor. 

so in ten years, give or take, how do you see yourself? are you a doctor with a photography hobby?

Yes! That’s exactly how I see myself. I actually also want to use photographs as some sort of journalistic approach if I go to work or volunteer in other countries. But right now, taking all heavy sciences in college drew me to art, because it gives me a break from all the biology and the chemistry. 

what do you like most about yourself?


My quietness.

flickr // tumblr
ZoomInfo
Analogue Blues
I met with this lovely photographer in one of the most unlikely places possible  - a Starbucks a couple blocks away from Grand Central right in the middle of the busy lunch hours. Sweet, soft-spoken, and humble, she was a pleasure to talk to. Keep reading to find out about lazy starfishes, the mystery in the identity, and haunting Jimmy Kimmel.

why Analogue Blues? how did that name come around?

I really like film photography. Being a college student, you’re not really drowning in money, and film is quite expensive - so the analogue part is because of my love for film, and the blues is because I don’t have enough money to shoot as much film as I would like to. 

how did you start out with photography? have you always done film?

I started out with digital at first, but I had my dad’s first film camera around, and I would play with that sometimes, and then I slowly got into it. 

what is it that you like about film?

I really like the grain, and I think that it feels very organic, and it just has a lot of surprises. 

what is your favourite thing to photograph? what are you drawn to?

I’m not quite sure yet. I’m doing a 52-week project, which I am about to end in a week or so, and I am using myself as a subject. But the thing is, I don’t like using myself, it’s more because I can’t find anyone to model, and my friends are kind of stiff. I do like the sky though. It changes every day, and I find it interesting.

why don’t you like taking photos of yourself?

I started out with conceptual work, and I thought that it would make me tap into my emotions. But I don’t think it did. Plus I cut my hair right now, and I like it when in photographs, hair flows. If I do portray myself, I cut out my head, or do a silhouette, or just don’t show my face in one way or another. I like having this mysterious person in my photographs.

what would your spirit animal be?

I was thinking about that today! I went to work, and I was looking at this starfish, and I just like how they’re so lazy, and they just float around. I would be a starfish.

if you were a ghost, who would you haunt?

I’m trying to think of comedians. They would make it really funny. Jimmy Kimmel.

what inspires you?

Tumblr. I’m getting into fashion photography because of it. Not the sharp shadows and the use of flash, but kind of a softer, more vintage feel. And music. My favourite bands are Phoenix, and The Killers. The Black Keys, Of Monsters and Men, that type of stuff.

what are you studying in college?

Medicine. As a kid, I knew what I wanted to do, but I didn’t know what exactly it was. I’ve always wanted to be a doctor. 

so in ten years, give or take, how do you see yourself? are you a doctor with a photography hobby?

Yes! That’s exactly how I see myself. I actually also want to use photographs as some sort of journalistic approach if I go to work or volunteer in other countries. But right now, taking all heavy sciences in college drew me to art, because it gives me a break from all the biology and the chemistry. 

what do you like most about yourself?


My quietness.

flickr // tumblr
ZoomInfo
Analogue Blues
I met with this lovely photographer in one of the most unlikely places possible  - a Starbucks a couple blocks away from Grand Central right in the middle of the busy lunch hours. Sweet, soft-spoken, and humble, she was a pleasure to talk to. Keep reading to find out about lazy starfishes, the mystery in the identity, and haunting Jimmy Kimmel.

why Analogue Blues? how did that name come around?

I really like film photography. Being a college student, you’re not really drowning in money, and film is quite expensive - so the analogue part is because of my love for film, and the blues is because I don’t have enough money to shoot as much film as I would like to. 

how did you start out with photography? have you always done film?

I started out with digital at first, but I had my dad’s first film camera around, and I would play with that sometimes, and then I slowly got into it. 

what is it that you like about film?

I really like the grain, and I think that it feels very organic, and it just has a lot of surprises. 

what is your favourite thing to photograph? what are you drawn to?

I’m not quite sure yet. I’m doing a 52-week project, which I am about to end in a week or so, and I am using myself as a subject. But the thing is, I don’t like using myself, it’s more because I can’t find anyone to model, and my friends are kind of stiff. I do like the sky though. It changes every day, and I find it interesting.

why don’t you like taking photos of yourself?

I started out with conceptual work, and I thought that it would make me tap into my emotions. But I don’t think it did. Plus I cut my hair right now, and I like it when in photographs, hair flows. If I do portray myself, I cut out my head, or do a silhouette, or just don’t show my face in one way or another. I like having this mysterious person in my photographs.

what would your spirit animal be?

I was thinking about that today! I went to work, and I was looking at this starfish, and I just like how they’re so lazy, and they just float around. I would be a starfish.

if you were a ghost, who would you haunt?

I’m trying to think of comedians. They would make it really funny. Jimmy Kimmel.

what inspires you?

Tumblr. I’m getting into fashion photography because of it. Not the sharp shadows and the use of flash, but kind of a softer, more vintage feel. And music. My favourite bands are Phoenix, and The Killers. The Black Keys, Of Monsters and Men, that type of stuff.

what are you studying in college?

Medicine. As a kid, I knew what I wanted to do, but I didn’t know what exactly it was. I’ve always wanted to be a doctor. 

so in ten years, give or take, how do you see yourself? are you a doctor with a photography hobby?

Yes! That’s exactly how I see myself. I actually also want to use photographs as some sort of journalistic approach if I go to work or volunteer in other countries. But right now, taking all heavy sciences in college drew me to art, because it gives me a break from all the biology and the chemistry. 

what do you like most about yourself?


My quietness.

flickr // tumblr
ZoomInfo

Analogue Blues

I met with this lovely photographer in one of the most unlikely places possible  - a Starbucks a couple blocks away from Grand Central right in the middle of the busy lunch hours. Sweet, soft-spoken, and humble, she was a pleasure to talk to. Keep reading to find out about lazy starfishes, the mystery in the identity, and haunting Jimmy Kimmel.

why Analogue Blues? how did that name come around?

I really like film photography. Being a college student, you’re not really drowning in money, and film is quite expensive - so the analogue part is because of my love for film, and the blues is because I don’t have enough money to shoot as much film as I would like to. 

how did you start out with photography? have you always done film?

I started out with digital at first, but I had my dad’s first film camera around, and I would play with that sometimes, and then I slowly got into it. 

what is it that you like about film?

I really like the grain, and I think that it feels very organic, and it just has a lot of surprises. 

what is your favourite thing to photograph? what are you drawn to?

I’m not quite sure yet. I’m doing a 52-week project, which I am about to end in a week or so, and I am using myself as a subject. But the thing is, I don’t like using myself, it’s more because I can’t find anyone to model, and my friends are kind of stiff. I do like the sky though. It changes every day, and I find it interesting.

why don’t you like taking photos of yourself?

I started out with conceptual work, and I thought that it would make me tap into my emotions. But I don’t think it did. Plus I cut my hair right now, and I like it when in photographs, hair flows. If I do portray myself, I cut out my head, or do a silhouette, or just don’t show my face in one way or another. I like having this mysterious person in my photographs.

what would your spirit animal be?

I was thinking about that today! I went to work, and I was looking at this starfish, and I just like how they’re so lazy, and they just float around. I would be a starfish.

if you were a ghost, who would you haunt?

I’m trying to think of comedians. They would make it really funny. Jimmy Kimmel.

what inspires you?

Tumblr. I’m getting into fashion photography because of it. Not the sharp shadows and the use of flash, but kind of a softer, more vintage feel. And music. My favourite bands are Phoenix, and The Killers. The Black Keys, Of Monsters and Men, that type of stuff.

what are you studying in college?

Medicine. As a kid, I knew what I wanted to do, but I didn’t know what exactly it was. I’ve always wanted to be a doctor. 

so in ten years, give or take, how do you see yourself? are you a doctor with a photography hobby?

Yes! That’s exactly how I see myself. I actually also want to use photographs as some sort of journalistic approach if I go to work or volunteer in other countries. But right now, taking all heavy sciences in college drew me to art, because it gives me a break from all the biology and the chemistry. 

what do you like most about yourself?

My quietness.

flickr // tumblr

Samantha Sealy
where are you from?  I’m from Norwich, Connecticut (USA)
where are you right now?  Living down the street from where I grew up.
where do you want to be? Anywhere that no one could ever find me. In my wildest dreams I could move somewhere like Iceland, it has one of my favorite landscapes on earth. Just anywhere I can be happy, really. 
flickr // tumblr // facebook
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Samantha Sealy
where are you from?  I’m from Norwich, Connecticut (USA)
where are you right now?  Living down the street from where I grew up.
where do you want to be? Anywhere that no one could ever find me. In my wildest dreams I could move somewhere like Iceland, it has one of my favorite landscapes on earth. Just anywhere I can be happy, really. 
flickr // tumblr // facebook
ZoomInfo
Samantha Sealy
where are you from?  I’m from Norwich, Connecticut (USA)
where are you right now?  Living down the street from where I grew up.
where do you want to be? Anywhere that no one could ever find me. In my wildest dreams I could move somewhere like Iceland, it has one of my favorite landscapes on earth. Just anywhere I can be happy, really. 
flickr // tumblr // facebook
ZoomInfo
Samantha Sealy
where are you from?  I’m from Norwich, Connecticut (USA)
where are you right now?  Living down the street from where I grew up.
where do you want to be? Anywhere that no one could ever find me. In my wildest dreams I could move somewhere like Iceland, it has one of my favorite landscapes on earth. Just anywhere I can be happy, really. 
flickr // tumblr // facebook
ZoomInfo
Samantha Sealy
where are you from?  I’m from Norwich, Connecticut (USA)
where are you right now?  Living down the street from where I grew up.
where do you want to be? Anywhere that no one could ever find me. In my wildest dreams I could move somewhere like Iceland, it has one of my favorite landscapes on earth. Just anywhere I can be happy, really. 
flickr // tumblr // facebook
ZoomInfo
Samantha Sealy
where are you from?  I’m from Norwich, Connecticut (USA)
where are you right now?  Living down the street from where I grew up.
where do you want to be? Anywhere that no one could ever find me. In my wildest dreams I could move somewhere like Iceland, it has one of my favorite landscapes on earth. Just anywhere I can be happy, really. 
flickr // tumblr // facebook
ZoomInfo
Samantha Sealy
where are you from?  I’m from Norwich, Connecticut (USA)
where are you right now?  Living down the street from where I grew up.
where do you want to be? Anywhere that no one could ever find me. In my wildest dreams I could move somewhere like Iceland, it has one of my favorite landscapes on earth. Just anywhere I can be happy, really. 
flickr // tumblr // facebook
ZoomInfo

Samantha Sealy

where are you from?  I’m from Norwich, Connecticut (USA)

where are you right now?  Living down the street from where I grew up.

where do you want to be? Anywhere that no one could ever find me. In my wildest dreams I could move somewhere like Iceland, it has one of my favorite landscapes on earth. Just anywhere I can be happy, really. 

flickr // tumblr // facebook

James Whiting
where are you from? I’m (still) from Melbourne, Australia. Oak Park to be exact. 
where are you right now? I’m currently in a cafe in Brunswick, paying too much money for not enough muesli. 
where do you want to be? I want to be a lot of places.. But they all seem to be places where I can simultaneously be completely at rest from things I don’t want to involve myself in, and live actively in the things I do. Camping on the coast is number one for now I think. 
tumblr // flickr // instagram
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James Whiting
where are you from? I’m (still) from Melbourne, Australia. Oak Park to be exact. 
where are you right now? I’m currently in a cafe in Brunswick, paying too much money for not enough muesli. 
where do you want to be? I want to be a lot of places.. But they all seem to be places where I can simultaneously be completely at rest from things I don’t want to involve myself in, and live actively in the things I do. Camping on the coast is number one for now I think. 
tumblr // flickr // instagram
ZoomInfo
James Whiting
where are you from? I’m (still) from Melbourne, Australia. Oak Park to be exact. 
where are you right now? I’m currently in a cafe in Brunswick, paying too much money for not enough muesli. 
where do you want to be? I want to be a lot of places.. But they all seem to be places where I can simultaneously be completely at rest from things I don’t want to involve myself in, and live actively in the things I do. Camping on the coast is number one for now I think. 
tumblr // flickr // instagram
ZoomInfo
James Whiting
where are you from? I’m (still) from Melbourne, Australia. Oak Park to be exact. 
where are you right now? I’m currently in a cafe in Brunswick, paying too much money for not enough muesli. 
where do you want to be? I want to be a lot of places.. But they all seem to be places where I can simultaneously be completely at rest from things I don’t want to involve myself in, and live actively in the things I do. Camping on the coast is number one for now I think. 
tumblr // flickr // instagram
ZoomInfo
James Whiting
where are you from? I’m (still) from Melbourne, Australia. Oak Park to be exact. 
where are you right now? I’m currently in a cafe in Brunswick, paying too much money for not enough muesli. 
where do you want to be? I want to be a lot of places.. But they all seem to be places where I can simultaneously be completely at rest from things I don’t want to involve myself in, and live actively in the things I do. Camping on the coast is number one for now I think. 
tumblr // flickr // instagram
ZoomInfo
James Whiting
where are you from? I’m (still) from Melbourne, Australia. Oak Park to be exact. 
where are you right now? I’m currently in a cafe in Brunswick, paying too much money for not enough muesli. 
where do you want to be? I want to be a lot of places.. But they all seem to be places where I can simultaneously be completely at rest from things I don’t want to involve myself in, and live actively in the things I do. Camping on the coast is number one for now I think. 
tumblr // flickr // instagram
ZoomInfo
James Whiting
where are you from? I’m (still) from Melbourne, Australia. Oak Park to be exact. 
where are you right now? I’m currently in a cafe in Brunswick, paying too much money for not enough muesli. 
where do you want to be? I want to be a lot of places.. But they all seem to be places where I can simultaneously be completely at rest from things I don’t want to involve myself in, and live actively in the things I do. Camping on the coast is number one for now I think. 
tumblr // flickr // instagram
ZoomInfo

James Whiting

where are you fromI’m (still) from Melbourne, Australia. Oak Park to be exact. 

where are you right now? I’m currently in a cafe in Brunswick, paying too much money for not enough muesli. 

where do you want to be? I want to be a lot of places.. But they all seem to be places where I can simultaneously be completely at rest from things I don’t want to involve myself in, and live actively in the things I do. Camping on the coast is number one for now I think. 

tumblr // flickr // instagram

Callum Painter
Part I: Black & White
where are you from? Im living in a small city in the UK called Norwich, its got a great vibe to it.The general Art scene here is good too, we have an Arts uni so we get all sorts of people come every year and more than often contribute to it. 
where do you want to be? Well i will be moving to Bristol in September to study Photography at UWE University. Hopefully this will open up more opportunities for me within photography. Currently Ive been assisting Joe Millington, a local photographer on some of her music videos. Gaining more experience in being a professional photographer and wish to continue this further to learn a new range of techniques in a professional environment.
flickr // tumblr // facebook // bigcartel
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Callum Painter
Part I: Black & White
where are you from? Im living in a small city in the UK called Norwich, its got a great vibe to it.The general Art scene here is good too, we have an Arts uni so we get all sorts of people come every year and more than often contribute to it. 
where do you want to be? Well i will be moving to Bristol in September to study Photography at UWE University. Hopefully this will open up more opportunities for me within photography. Currently Ive been assisting Joe Millington, a local photographer on some of her music videos. Gaining more experience in being a professional photographer and wish to continue this further to learn a new range of techniques in a professional environment.
flickr // tumblr // facebook // bigcartel
ZoomInfo
Callum Painter
Part I: Black & White
where are you from? Im living in a small city in the UK called Norwich, its got a great vibe to it.The general Art scene here is good too, we have an Arts uni so we get all sorts of people come every year and more than often contribute to it. 
where do you want to be? Well i will be moving to Bristol in September to study Photography at UWE University. Hopefully this will open up more opportunities for me within photography. Currently Ive been assisting Joe Millington, a local photographer on some of her music videos. Gaining more experience in being a professional photographer and wish to continue this further to learn a new range of techniques in a professional environment.
flickr // tumblr // facebook // bigcartel
ZoomInfo
Callum Painter
Part I: Black & White
where are you from? Im living in a small city in the UK called Norwich, its got a great vibe to it.The general Art scene here is good too, we have an Arts uni so we get all sorts of people come every year and more than often contribute to it. 
where do you want to be? Well i will be moving to Bristol in September to study Photography at UWE University. Hopefully this will open up more opportunities for me within photography. Currently Ive been assisting Joe Millington, a local photographer on some of her music videos. Gaining more experience in being a professional photographer and wish to continue this further to learn a new range of techniques in a professional environment.
flickr // tumblr // facebook // bigcartel
ZoomInfo
Callum Painter
Part I: Black & White
where are you from? Im living in a small city in the UK called Norwich, its got a great vibe to it.The general Art scene here is good too, we have an Arts uni so we get all sorts of people come every year and more than often contribute to it. 
where do you want to be? Well i will be moving to Bristol in September to study Photography at UWE University. Hopefully this will open up more opportunities for me within photography. Currently Ive been assisting Joe Millington, a local photographer on some of her music videos. Gaining more experience in being a professional photographer and wish to continue this further to learn a new range of techniques in a professional environment.
flickr // tumblr // facebook // bigcartel
ZoomInfo

Callum Painter

Part I: Black & White

where are you from? Im living in a small city in the UK called Norwich, its got a great vibe to it.The general Art scene here is good too, we have an Arts uni so we get all sorts of people come every year and more than often contribute to it. 

where do you want to be? Well i will be moving to Bristol in September to study Photography at UWE University. Hopefully this will open up more opportunities for me within photography. Currently Ive been assisting Joe Millington, a local photographer on some of her music videos. Gaining more experience in being a professional photographer and wish to continue this further to learn a new range of techniques in a professional environment.

flickr // tumblr // facebook // bigcartel

Natalye Anne St. Lucia
Natalye kept popping up in the “Explore” tab of my Instagram for the longest time, and after I kept stumbling onto her incredible work over and over, I thought it was fate and got in touch with her for an interview. She’s also the sweetest, most patient human ever, who waited for me while I got lost for half an hour two streets away in the scorching mid-June heat. Keep reading to find out about ghost haunting the Beatles, first cameras from Walmart, and cowboys in California.
where are you from?

California.

how do you think growing up there shaped you as a person?

I found myself always looking for different kinds of people. I grew up in a city that was such a melting pot, and there were so many different types of people - culturally and personality-wise - and I feel more comfortable in an environment where there’s a lot of diversity.

how did you end up in New York?

Adventure drew me me out here.

what’s the first thing you did when you came here?

I came here, to Brooklyn Bridge Park. I just stared at this skyline.

I saw that you have done a roadtrip recently on your way here. how was that experience for you?

I love roadtrips. I love roadtrips more than flying, because you get to see everything along the way. It was a really long journey. We left Portland in the beginning of April, and we went down to California for two weeks to stay with some family and explore around the coast ares. The trip was a lot faster than we thought it would be, and we took a 4-5-day trip out here.

to someone who’s never seen a single photograph of yours, how would you describe your work?

I think right now I am in such an experimental phase with my photography. I personally love working with people and taking portraits. I think most recently dabbling into studio work I’ve tried to bring nature into the studio with a lot of colour and florals - plants, flowers, things like that. Gosh, describing it in one word though… Colourful. Experimental.

it seems that you’re gravitating towards very distinct, yummy colours.

Yeah, I’ve always gravitated towards pastel natural colours. Natural pinks, yellows. Green is my favourite.

when did you first start getting into photography?

I was very little. My godmother was the one who introduced me to it. She wasn’t a professional photographer, but it was a really strong hobby of hers that she pursued. I got my first camera when I was 10, it was a little film camera from Walmart. And I just started taking pictures of everything. As I got into high school, I started pursuing it more as a career, and began shooting friends, and I did a wedding once when I was seventeen, and I realized that I would never shoot a wedding again.

everyone I talk to says that, everyone apparently hates shooting weddings!

It’s just not my thing, I don’t know what it is. I should never say never, but for now, it’s not it.

Digital or film?

I shoot a little bit of both, mostly digital, because it’s just cheaper, to be honest. But I do film on the side. 

how do you feel about concept in art?

I think sometimes I do have a concept in art. A lot of times I find myself really inspired by music and colour. And I kind of like to let things happen naturally, develop a relationship with the person I’m shooting - then it’s more of a collaborative effort and seeing where it goes, rather than having a solid thing that I am looking for. I feel that this is how your best images come out, at least for myself. 

what else inspires you?

Travel. People. Music. I’m really inspired by music. Most of my shoots I have music playing. I get inspired by certain songs I’m listening to, certain bands. And then I find myself starting from there.

what music are you listening to?

Right now I’m listening to Cat Stevens. He’s really good to listen to on the subway. Nurses, they’re a band from Portland and they’re great.

have you had any crazy experiences happen to you here yet?

No! Wait, no, actually that’s a lie, I had a run-in with the cops the other day. They’re getting the loft out next to mine. I heard the workers start to fight, and it sounded like someone was dying, so I called the cops. Everyone was fine though, and it wasn’t a big deal. Citizens looking out for other citizens.

was there ever a photograph you never took? something you wished you had taken, but didn’t, for any reason at all?

Not any in particular that I feel really strongly about, but I do remember driving to Santa Cruz in California one time, and there was a cowboy outside his truck. It was the cutest thing, he was painting the mountains. I wish I had that photo, but more for my personal archive, not so much to share with people.

do you have any interest in filmmaking?

I do, actually, I wouldn’t day that I have any work that I would show professionally, but it is something that I would like to dabble into in the future, definitely,

what is your favourite thing about being a photographer?

Being able to explore and meet new people.

how about least favourite?

The business part of it. It makes me so uncomfortable. 

what has been the most surreal moment of your life so far?

Being able to live freely in terms of pursuing my dreams, and not being shaped by others, not feeling trapped by what others think I should do, and just going for what I want.

if you were a ghost, who would you haunt?

Probably The Beatles, that would be amazing. I think I would just follow them around on tour, and watch them grow as artists.


what do you like to do outside of photography?

I don’t know, my life is so absorbed with it. Walking around, hanging out with friends, talking, travelling - which kind of goes hand in hand with photography, I guess.

website // tumblr // instagram
ZoomInfo
Natalye Anne St. Lucia
Natalye kept popping up in the “Explore” tab of my Instagram for the longest time, and after I kept stumbling onto her incredible work over and over, I thought it was fate and got in touch with her for an interview. She’s also the sweetest, most patient human ever, who waited for me while I got lost for half an hour two streets away in the scorching mid-June heat. Keep reading to find out about ghost haunting the Beatles, first cameras from Walmart, and cowboys in California.
where are you from?

California.

how do you think growing up there shaped you as a person?

I found myself always looking for different kinds of people. I grew up in a city that was such a melting pot, and there were so many different types of people - culturally and personality-wise - and I feel more comfortable in an environment where there’s a lot of diversity.

how did you end up in New York?

Adventure drew me me out here.

what’s the first thing you did when you came here?

I came here, to Brooklyn Bridge Park. I just stared at this skyline.

I saw that you have done a roadtrip recently on your way here. how was that experience for you?

I love roadtrips. I love roadtrips more than flying, because you get to see everything along the way. It was a really long journey. We left Portland in the beginning of April, and we went down to California for two weeks to stay with some family and explore around the coast ares. The trip was a lot faster than we thought it would be, and we took a 4-5-day trip out here.

to someone who’s never seen a single photograph of yours, how would you describe your work?

I think right now I am in such an experimental phase with my photography. I personally love working with people and taking portraits. I think most recently dabbling into studio work I’ve tried to bring nature into the studio with a lot of colour and florals - plants, flowers, things like that. Gosh, describing it in one word though… Colourful. Experimental.

it seems that you’re gravitating towards very distinct, yummy colours.

Yeah, I’ve always gravitated towards pastel natural colours. Natural pinks, yellows. Green is my favourite.

when did you first start getting into photography?

I was very little. My godmother was the one who introduced me to it. She wasn’t a professional photographer, but it was a really strong hobby of hers that she pursued. I got my first camera when I was 10, it was a little film camera from Walmart. And I just started taking pictures of everything. As I got into high school, I started pursuing it more as a career, and began shooting friends, and I did a wedding once when I was seventeen, and I realized that I would never shoot a wedding again.

everyone I talk to says that, everyone apparently hates shooting weddings!

It’s just not my thing, I don’t know what it is. I should never say never, but for now, it’s not it.

Digital or film?

I shoot a little bit of both, mostly digital, because it’s just cheaper, to be honest. But I do film on the side. 

how do you feel about concept in art?

I think sometimes I do have a concept in art. A lot of times I find myself really inspired by music and colour. And I kind of like to let things happen naturally, develop a relationship with the person I’m shooting - then it’s more of a collaborative effort and seeing where it goes, rather than having a solid thing that I am looking for. I feel that this is how your best images come out, at least for myself. 

what else inspires you?

Travel. People. Music. I’m really inspired by music. Most of my shoots I have music playing. I get inspired by certain songs I’m listening to, certain bands. And then I find myself starting from there.

what music are you listening to?

Right now I’m listening to Cat Stevens. He’s really good to listen to on the subway. Nurses, they’re a band from Portland and they’re great.

have you had any crazy experiences happen to you here yet?

No! Wait, no, actually that’s a lie, I had a run-in with the cops the other day. They’re getting the loft out next to mine. I heard the workers start to fight, and it sounded like someone was dying, so I called the cops. Everyone was fine though, and it wasn’t a big deal. Citizens looking out for other citizens.

was there ever a photograph you never took? something you wished you had taken, but didn’t, for any reason at all?

Not any in particular that I feel really strongly about, but I do remember driving to Santa Cruz in California one time, and there was a cowboy outside his truck. It was the cutest thing, he was painting the mountains. I wish I had that photo, but more for my personal archive, not so much to share with people.

do you have any interest in filmmaking?

I do, actually, I wouldn’t day that I have any work that I would show professionally, but it is something that I would like to dabble into in the future, definitely,

what is your favourite thing about being a photographer?

Being able to explore and meet new people.

how about least favourite?

The business part of it. It makes me so uncomfortable. 

what has been the most surreal moment of your life so far?

Being able to live freely in terms of pursuing my dreams, and not being shaped by others, not feeling trapped by what others think I should do, and just going for what I want.

if you were a ghost, who would you haunt?

Probably The Beatles, that would be amazing. I think I would just follow them around on tour, and watch them grow as artists.


what do you like to do outside of photography?

I don’t know, my life is so absorbed with it. Walking around, hanging out with friends, talking, travelling - which kind of goes hand in hand with photography, I guess.

website // tumblr // instagram
ZoomInfo
Natalye Anne St. Lucia
Natalye kept popping up in the “Explore” tab of my Instagram for the longest time, and after I kept stumbling onto her incredible work over and over, I thought it was fate and got in touch with her for an interview. She’s also the sweetest, most patient human ever, who waited for me while I got lost for half an hour two streets away in the scorching mid-June heat. Keep reading to find out about ghost haunting the Beatles, first cameras from Walmart, and cowboys in California.
where are you from?

California.

how do you think growing up there shaped you as a person?

I found myself always looking for different kinds of people. I grew up in a city that was such a melting pot, and there were so many different types of people - culturally and personality-wise - and I feel more comfortable in an environment where there’s a lot of diversity.

how did you end up in New York?

Adventure drew me me out here.

what’s the first thing you did when you came here?

I came here, to Brooklyn Bridge Park. I just stared at this skyline.

I saw that you have done a roadtrip recently on your way here. how was that experience for you?

I love roadtrips. I love roadtrips more than flying, because you get to see everything along the way. It was a really long journey. We left Portland in the beginning of April, and we went down to California for two weeks to stay with some family and explore around the coast ares. The trip was a lot faster than we thought it would be, and we took a 4-5-day trip out here.

to someone who’s never seen a single photograph of yours, how would you describe your work?

I think right now I am in such an experimental phase with my photography. I personally love working with people and taking portraits. I think most recently dabbling into studio work I’ve tried to bring nature into the studio with a lot of colour and florals - plants, flowers, things like that. Gosh, describing it in one word though… Colourful. Experimental.

it seems that you’re gravitating towards very distinct, yummy colours.

Yeah, I’ve always gravitated towards pastel natural colours. Natural pinks, yellows. Green is my favourite.

when did you first start getting into photography?

I was very little. My godmother was the one who introduced me to it. She wasn’t a professional photographer, but it was a really strong hobby of hers that she pursued. I got my first camera when I was 10, it was a little film camera from Walmart. And I just started taking pictures of everything. As I got into high school, I started pursuing it more as a career, and began shooting friends, and I did a wedding once when I was seventeen, and I realized that I would never shoot a wedding again.

everyone I talk to says that, everyone apparently hates shooting weddings!

It’s just not my thing, I don’t know what it is. I should never say never, but for now, it’s not it.

Digital or film?

I shoot a little bit of both, mostly digital, because it’s just cheaper, to be honest. But I do film on the side. 

how do you feel about concept in art?

I think sometimes I do have a concept in art. A lot of times I find myself really inspired by music and colour. And I kind of like to let things happen naturally, develop a relationship with the person I’m shooting - then it’s more of a collaborative effort and seeing where it goes, rather than having a solid thing that I am looking for. I feel that this is how your best images come out, at least for myself. 

what else inspires you?

Travel. People. Music. I’m really inspired by music. Most of my shoots I have music playing. I get inspired by certain songs I’m listening to, certain bands. And then I find myself starting from there.

what music are you listening to?

Right now I’m listening to Cat Stevens. He’s really good to listen to on the subway. Nurses, they’re a band from Portland and they’re great.

have you had any crazy experiences happen to you here yet?

No! Wait, no, actually that’s a lie, I had a run-in with the cops the other day. They’re getting the loft out next to mine. I heard the workers start to fight, and it sounded like someone was dying, so I called the cops. Everyone was fine though, and it wasn’t a big deal. Citizens looking out for other citizens.

was there ever a photograph you never took? something you wished you had taken, but didn’t, for any reason at all?

Not any in particular that I feel really strongly about, but I do remember driving to Santa Cruz in California one time, and there was a cowboy outside his truck. It was the cutest thing, he was painting the mountains. I wish I had that photo, but more for my personal archive, not so much to share with people.

do you have any interest in filmmaking?

I do, actually, I wouldn’t day that I have any work that I would show professionally, but it is something that I would like to dabble into in the future, definitely,

what is your favourite thing about being a photographer?

Being able to explore and meet new people.

how about least favourite?

The business part of it. It makes me so uncomfortable. 

what has been the most surreal moment of your life so far?

Being able to live freely in terms of pursuing my dreams, and not being shaped by others, not feeling trapped by what others think I should do, and just going for what I want.

if you were a ghost, who would you haunt?

Probably The Beatles, that would be amazing. I think I would just follow them around on tour, and watch them grow as artists.


what do you like to do outside of photography?

I don’t know, my life is so absorbed with it. Walking around, hanging out with friends, talking, travelling - which kind of goes hand in hand with photography, I guess.

website // tumblr // instagram
ZoomInfo
Natalye Anne St. Lucia
Natalye kept popping up in the “Explore” tab of my Instagram for the longest time, and after I kept stumbling onto her incredible work over and over, I thought it was fate and got in touch with her for an interview. She’s also the sweetest, most patient human ever, who waited for me while I got lost for half an hour two streets away in the scorching mid-June heat. Keep reading to find out about ghost haunting the Beatles, first cameras from Walmart, and cowboys in California.
where are you from?

California.

how do you think growing up there shaped you as a person?

I found myself always looking for different kinds of people. I grew up in a city that was such a melting pot, and there were so many different types of people - culturally and personality-wise - and I feel more comfortable in an environment where there’s a lot of diversity.

how did you end up in New York?

Adventure drew me me out here.

what’s the first thing you did when you came here?

I came here, to Brooklyn Bridge Park. I just stared at this skyline.

I saw that you have done a roadtrip recently on your way here. how was that experience for you?

I love roadtrips. I love roadtrips more than flying, because you get to see everything along the way. It was a really long journey. We left Portland in the beginning of April, and we went down to California for two weeks to stay with some family and explore around the coast ares. The trip was a lot faster than we thought it would be, and we took a 4-5-day trip out here.

to someone who’s never seen a single photograph of yours, how would you describe your work?

I think right now I am in such an experimental phase with my photography. I personally love working with people and taking portraits. I think most recently dabbling into studio work I’ve tried to bring nature into the studio with a lot of colour and florals - plants, flowers, things like that. Gosh, describing it in one word though… Colourful. Experimental.

it seems that you’re gravitating towards very distinct, yummy colours.

Yeah, I’ve always gravitated towards pastel natural colours. Natural pinks, yellows. Green is my favourite.

when did you first start getting into photography?

I was very little. My godmother was the one who introduced me to it. She wasn’t a professional photographer, but it was a really strong hobby of hers that she pursued. I got my first camera when I was 10, it was a little film camera from Walmart. And I just started taking pictures of everything. As I got into high school, I started pursuing it more as a career, and began shooting friends, and I did a wedding once when I was seventeen, and I realized that I would never shoot a wedding again.

everyone I talk to says that, everyone apparently hates shooting weddings!

It’s just not my thing, I don’t know what it is. I should never say never, but for now, it’s not it.

Digital or film?

I shoot a little bit of both, mostly digital, because it’s just cheaper, to be honest. But I do film on the side. 

how do you feel about concept in art?

I think sometimes I do have a concept in art. A lot of times I find myself really inspired by music and colour. And I kind of like to let things happen naturally, develop a relationship with the person I’m shooting - then it’s more of a collaborative effort and seeing where it goes, rather than having a solid thing that I am looking for. I feel that this is how your best images come out, at least for myself. 

what else inspires you?

Travel. People. Music. I’m really inspired by music. Most of my shoots I have music playing. I get inspired by certain songs I’m listening to, certain bands. And then I find myself starting from there.

what music are you listening to?

Right now I’m listening to Cat Stevens. He’s really good to listen to on the subway. Nurses, they’re a band from Portland and they’re great.

have you had any crazy experiences happen to you here yet?

No! Wait, no, actually that’s a lie, I had a run-in with the cops the other day. They’re getting the loft out next to mine. I heard the workers start to fight, and it sounded like someone was dying, so I called the cops. Everyone was fine though, and it wasn’t a big deal. Citizens looking out for other citizens.

was there ever a photograph you never took? something you wished you had taken, but didn’t, for any reason at all?

Not any in particular that I feel really strongly about, but I do remember driving to Santa Cruz in California one time, and there was a cowboy outside his truck. It was the cutest thing, he was painting the mountains. I wish I had that photo, but more for my personal archive, not so much to share with people.

do you have any interest in filmmaking?

I do, actually, I wouldn’t day that I have any work that I would show professionally, but it is something that I would like to dabble into in the future, definitely,

what is your favourite thing about being a photographer?

Being able to explore and meet new people.

how about least favourite?

The business part of it. It makes me so uncomfortable. 

what has been the most surreal moment of your life so far?

Being able to live freely in terms of pursuing my dreams, and not being shaped by others, not feeling trapped by what others think I should do, and just going for what I want.

if you were a ghost, who would you haunt?

Probably The Beatles, that would be amazing. I think I would just follow them around on tour, and watch them grow as artists.


what do you like to do outside of photography?

I don’t know, my life is so absorbed with it. Walking around, hanging out with friends, talking, travelling - which kind of goes hand in hand with photography, I guess.

website // tumblr // instagram
ZoomInfo
Natalye Anne St. Lucia
Natalye kept popping up in the “Explore” tab of my Instagram for the longest time, and after I kept stumbling onto her incredible work over and over, I thought it was fate and got in touch with her for an interview. She’s also the sweetest, most patient human ever, who waited for me while I got lost for half an hour two streets away in the scorching mid-June heat. Keep reading to find out about ghost haunting the Beatles, first cameras from Walmart, and cowboys in California.
where are you from?

California.

how do you think growing up there shaped you as a person?

I found myself always looking for different kinds of people. I grew up in a city that was such a melting pot, and there were so many different types of people - culturally and personality-wise - and I feel more comfortable in an environment where there’s a lot of diversity.

how did you end up in New York?

Adventure drew me me out here.

what’s the first thing you did when you came here?

I came here, to Brooklyn Bridge Park. I just stared at this skyline.

I saw that you have done a roadtrip recently on your way here. how was that experience for you?

I love roadtrips. I love roadtrips more than flying, because you get to see everything along the way. It was a really long journey. We left Portland in the beginning of April, and we went down to California for two weeks to stay with some family and explore around the coast ares. The trip was a lot faster than we thought it would be, and we took a 4-5-day trip out here.

to someone who’s never seen a single photograph of yours, how would you describe your work?

I think right now I am in such an experimental phase with my photography. I personally love working with people and taking portraits. I think most recently dabbling into studio work I’ve tried to bring nature into the studio with a lot of colour and florals - plants, flowers, things like that. Gosh, describing it in one word though… Colourful. Experimental.

it seems that you’re gravitating towards very distinct, yummy colours.

Yeah, I’ve always gravitated towards pastel natural colours. Natural pinks, yellows. Green is my favourite.

when did you first start getting into photography?

I was very little. My godmother was the one who introduced me to it. She wasn’t a professional photographer, but it was a really strong hobby of hers that she pursued. I got my first camera when I was 10, it was a little film camera from Walmart. And I just started taking pictures of everything. As I got into high school, I started pursuing it more as a career, and began shooting friends, and I did a wedding once when I was seventeen, and I realized that I would never shoot a wedding again.

everyone I talk to says that, everyone apparently hates shooting weddings!

It’s just not my thing, I don’t know what it is. I should never say never, but for now, it’s not it.

Digital or film?

I shoot a little bit of both, mostly digital, because it’s just cheaper, to be honest. But I do film on the side. 

how do you feel about concept in art?

I think sometimes I do have a concept in art. A lot of times I find myself really inspired by music and colour. And I kind of like to let things happen naturally, develop a relationship with the person I’m shooting - then it’s more of a collaborative effort and seeing where it goes, rather than having a solid thing that I am looking for. I feel that this is how your best images come out, at least for myself. 

what else inspires you?

Travel. People. Music. I’m really inspired by music. Most of my shoots I have music playing. I get inspired by certain songs I’m listening to, certain bands. And then I find myself starting from there.

what music are you listening to?

Right now I’m listening to Cat Stevens. He’s really good to listen to on the subway. Nurses, they’re a band from Portland and they’re great.

have you had any crazy experiences happen to you here yet?

No! Wait, no, actually that’s a lie, I had a run-in with the cops the other day. They’re getting the loft out next to mine. I heard the workers start to fight, and it sounded like someone was dying, so I called the cops. Everyone was fine though, and it wasn’t a big deal. Citizens looking out for other citizens.

was there ever a photograph you never took? something you wished you had taken, but didn’t, for any reason at all?

Not any in particular that I feel really strongly about, but I do remember driving to Santa Cruz in California one time, and there was a cowboy outside his truck. It was the cutest thing, he was painting the mountains. I wish I had that photo, but more for my personal archive, not so much to share with people.

do you have any interest in filmmaking?

I do, actually, I wouldn’t day that I have any work that I would show professionally, but it is something that I would like to dabble into in the future, definitely,

what is your favourite thing about being a photographer?

Being able to explore and meet new people.

how about least favourite?

The business part of it. It makes me so uncomfortable. 

what has been the most surreal moment of your life so far?

Being able to live freely in terms of pursuing my dreams, and not being shaped by others, not feeling trapped by what others think I should do, and just going for what I want.

if you were a ghost, who would you haunt?

Probably The Beatles, that would be amazing. I think I would just follow them around on tour, and watch them grow as artists.


what do you like to do outside of photography?

I don’t know, my life is so absorbed with it. Walking around, hanging out with friends, talking, travelling - which kind of goes hand in hand with photography, I guess.

website // tumblr // instagram
ZoomInfo
Natalye Anne St. Lucia
Natalye kept popping up in the “Explore” tab of my Instagram for the longest time, and after I kept stumbling onto her incredible work over and over, I thought it was fate and got in touch with her for an interview. She’s also the sweetest, most patient human ever, who waited for me while I got lost for half an hour two streets away in the scorching mid-June heat. Keep reading to find out about ghost haunting the Beatles, first cameras from Walmart, and cowboys in California.
where are you from?

California.

how do you think growing up there shaped you as a person?

I found myself always looking for different kinds of people. I grew up in a city that was such a melting pot, and there were so many different types of people - culturally and personality-wise - and I feel more comfortable in an environment where there’s a lot of diversity.

how did you end up in New York?

Adventure drew me me out here.

what’s the first thing you did when you came here?

I came here, to Brooklyn Bridge Park. I just stared at this skyline.

I saw that you have done a roadtrip recently on your way here. how was that experience for you?

I love roadtrips. I love roadtrips more than flying, because you get to see everything along the way. It was a really long journey. We left Portland in the beginning of April, and we went down to California for two weeks to stay with some family and explore around the coast ares. The trip was a lot faster than we thought it would be, and we took a 4-5-day trip out here.

to someone who’s never seen a single photograph of yours, how would you describe your work?

I think right now I am in such an experimental phase with my photography. I personally love working with people and taking portraits. I think most recently dabbling into studio work I’ve tried to bring nature into the studio with a lot of colour and florals - plants, flowers, things like that. Gosh, describing it in one word though… Colourful. Experimental.

it seems that you’re gravitating towards very distinct, yummy colours.

Yeah, I’ve always gravitated towards pastel natural colours. Natural pinks, yellows. Green is my favourite.

when did you first start getting into photography?

I was very little. My godmother was the one who introduced me to it. She wasn’t a professional photographer, but it was a really strong hobby of hers that she pursued. I got my first camera when I was 10, it was a little film camera from Walmart. And I just started taking pictures of everything. As I got into high school, I started pursuing it more as a career, and began shooting friends, and I did a wedding once when I was seventeen, and I realized that I would never shoot a wedding again.

everyone I talk to says that, everyone apparently hates shooting weddings!

It’s just not my thing, I don’t know what it is. I should never say never, but for now, it’s not it.

Digital or film?

I shoot a little bit of both, mostly digital, because it’s just cheaper, to be honest. But I do film on the side. 

how do you feel about concept in art?

I think sometimes I do have a concept in art. A lot of times I find myself really inspired by music and colour. And I kind of like to let things happen naturally, develop a relationship with the person I’m shooting - then it’s more of a collaborative effort and seeing where it goes, rather than having a solid thing that I am looking for. I feel that this is how your best images come out, at least for myself. 

what else inspires you?

Travel. People. Music. I’m really inspired by music. Most of my shoots I have music playing. I get inspired by certain songs I’m listening to, certain bands. And then I find myself starting from there.

what music are you listening to?

Right now I’m listening to Cat Stevens. He’s really good to listen to on the subway. Nurses, they’re a band from Portland and they’re great.

have you had any crazy experiences happen to you here yet?

No! Wait, no, actually that’s a lie, I had a run-in with the cops the other day. They’re getting the loft out next to mine. I heard the workers start to fight, and it sounded like someone was dying, so I called the cops. Everyone was fine though, and it wasn’t a big deal. Citizens looking out for other citizens.

was there ever a photograph you never took? something you wished you had taken, but didn’t, for any reason at all?

Not any in particular that I feel really strongly about, but I do remember driving to Santa Cruz in California one time, and there was a cowboy outside his truck. It was the cutest thing, he was painting the mountains. I wish I had that photo, but more for my personal archive, not so much to share with people.

do you have any interest in filmmaking?

I do, actually, I wouldn’t day that I have any work that I would show professionally, but it is something that I would like to dabble into in the future, definitely,

what is your favourite thing about being a photographer?

Being able to explore and meet new people.

how about least favourite?

The business part of it. It makes me so uncomfortable. 

what has been the most surreal moment of your life so far?

Being able to live freely in terms of pursuing my dreams, and not being shaped by others, not feeling trapped by what others think I should do, and just going for what I want.

if you were a ghost, who would you haunt?

Probably The Beatles, that would be amazing. I think I would just follow them around on tour, and watch them grow as artists.


what do you like to do outside of photography?

I don’t know, my life is so absorbed with it. Walking around, hanging out with friends, talking, travelling - which kind of goes hand in hand with photography, I guess.

website // tumblr // instagram
ZoomInfo
Natalye Anne St. Lucia
Natalye kept popping up in the “Explore” tab of my Instagram for the longest time, and after I kept stumbling onto her incredible work over and over, I thought it was fate and got in touch with her for an interview. She’s also the sweetest, most patient human ever, who waited for me while I got lost for half an hour two streets away in the scorching mid-June heat. Keep reading to find out about ghost haunting the Beatles, first cameras from Walmart, and cowboys in California.
where are you from?

California.

how do you think growing up there shaped you as a person?

I found myself always looking for different kinds of people. I grew up in a city that was such a melting pot, and there were so many different types of people - culturally and personality-wise - and I feel more comfortable in an environment where there’s a lot of diversity.

how did you end up in New York?

Adventure drew me me out here.

what’s the first thing you did when you came here?

I came here, to Brooklyn Bridge Park. I just stared at this skyline.

I saw that you have done a roadtrip recently on your way here. how was that experience for you?

I love roadtrips. I love roadtrips more than flying, because you get to see everything along the way. It was a really long journey. We left Portland in the beginning of April, and we went down to California for two weeks to stay with some family and explore around the coast ares. The trip was a lot faster than we thought it would be, and we took a 4-5-day trip out here.

to someone who’s never seen a single photograph of yours, how would you describe your work?

I think right now I am in such an experimental phase with my photography. I personally love working with people and taking portraits. I think most recently dabbling into studio work I’ve tried to bring nature into the studio with a lot of colour and florals - plants, flowers, things like that. Gosh, describing it in one word though… Colourful. Experimental.

it seems that you’re gravitating towards very distinct, yummy colours.

Yeah, I’ve always gravitated towards pastel natural colours. Natural pinks, yellows. Green is my favourite.

when did you first start getting into photography?

I was very little. My godmother was the one who introduced me to it. She wasn’t a professional photographer, but it was a really strong hobby of hers that she pursued. I got my first camera when I was 10, it was a little film camera from Walmart. And I just started taking pictures of everything. As I got into high school, I started pursuing it more as a career, and began shooting friends, and I did a wedding once when I was seventeen, and I realized that I would never shoot a wedding again.

everyone I talk to says that, everyone apparently hates shooting weddings!

It’s just not my thing, I don’t know what it is. I should never say never, but for now, it’s not it.

Digital or film?

I shoot a little bit of both, mostly digital, because it’s just cheaper, to be honest. But I do film on the side. 

how do you feel about concept in art?

I think sometimes I do have a concept in art. A lot of times I find myself really inspired by music and colour. And I kind of like to let things happen naturally, develop a relationship with the person I’m shooting - then it’s more of a collaborative effort and seeing where it goes, rather than having a solid thing that I am looking for. I feel that this is how your best images come out, at least for myself. 

what else inspires you?

Travel. People. Music. I’m really inspired by music. Most of my shoots I have music playing. I get inspired by certain songs I’m listening to, certain bands. And then I find myself starting from there.

what music are you listening to?

Right now I’m listening to Cat Stevens. He’s really good to listen to on the subway. Nurses, they’re a band from Portland and they’re great.

have you had any crazy experiences happen to you here yet?

No! Wait, no, actually that’s a lie, I had a run-in with the cops the other day. They’re getting the loft out next to mine. I heard the workers start to fight, and it sounded like someone was dying, so I called the cops. Everyone was fine though, and it wasn’t a big deal. Citizens looking out for other citizens.

was there ever a photograph you never took? something you wished you had taken, but didn’t, for any reason at all?

Not any in particular that I feel really strongly about, but I do remember driving to Santa Cruz in California one time, and there was a cowboy outside his truck. It was the cutest thing, he was painting the mountains. I wish I had that photo, but more for my personal archive, not so much to share with people.

do you have any interest in filmmaking?

I do, actually, I wouldn’t day that I have any work that I would show professionally, but it is something that I would like to dabble into in the future, definitely,

what is your favourite thing about being a photographer?

Being able to explore and meet new people.

how about least favourite?

The business part of it. It makes me so uncomfortable. 

what has been the most surreal moment of your life so far?

Being able to live freely in terms of pursuing my dreams, and not being shaped by others, not feeling trapped by what others think I should do, and just going for what I want.

if you were a ghost, who would you haunt?

Probably The Beatles, that would be amazing. I think I would just follow them around on tour, and watch them grow as artists.


what do you like to do outside of photography?

I don’t know, my life is so absorbed with it. Walking around, hanging out with friends, talking, travelling - which kind of goes hand in hand with photography, I guess.

website // tumblr // instagram
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Natalye Anne St. Lucia

Natalye kept popping up in the “Explore” tab of my Instagram for the longest time, and after I kept stumbling onto her incredible work over and over, I thought it was fate and got in touch with her for an interview. She’s also the sweetest, most patient human ever, who waited for me while I got lost for half an hour two streets away in the scorching mid-June heat. Keep reading to find out about ghost haunting the Beatles, first cameras from Walmart, and cowboys in California.

where are you from?

California.

how do you think growing up there shaped you as a person?

I found myself always looking for different kinds of people. I grew up in a city that was such a melting pot, and there were so many different types of people - culturally and personality-wise - and I feel more comfortable in an environment where there’s a lot of diversity.

how did you end up in New York?

Adventure drew me me out here.

what’s the first thing you did when you came here?

I came here, to Brooklyn Bridge Park. I just stared at this skyline.

I saw that you have done a roadtrip recently on your way here. how was that experience for you?

I love roadtrips. I love roadtrips more than flying, because you get to see everything along the way. It was a really long journey. We left Portland in the beginning of April, and we went down to California for two weeks to stay with some family and explore around the coast ares. The trip was a lot faster than we thought it would be, and we took a 4-5-day trip out here.

to someone who’s never seen a single photograph of yours, how would you describe your work?

I think right now I am in such an experimental phase with my photography. I personally love working with people and taking portraits. I think most recently dabbling into studio work I’ve tried to bring nature into the studio with a lot of colour and florals - plants, flowers, things like that. Gosh, describing it in one word though… Colourful. Experimental.

it seems that you’re gravitating towards very distinct, yummy colours.

Yeah, I’ve always gravitated towards pastel natural colours. Natural pinks, yellows. Green is my favourite.

when did you first start getting into photography?

I was very little. My godmother was the one who introduced me to it. She wasn’t a professional photographer, but it was a really strong hobby of hers that she pursued. I got my first camera when I was 10, it was a little film camera from Walmart. And I just started taking pictures of everything. As I got into high school, I started pursuing it more as a career, and began shooting friends, and I did a wedding once when I was seventeen, and I realized that I would never shoot a wedding again.

everyone I talk to says that, everyone apparently hates shooting weddings!

It’s just not my thing, I don’t know what it is. I should never say never, but for now, it’s not it.

Digital or film?

I shoot a little bit of both, mostly digital, because it’s just cheaper, to be honest. But I do film on the side. 

how do you feel about concept in art?

I think sometimes I do have a concept in art. A lot of times I find myself really inspired by music and colour. And I kind of like to let things happen naturally, develop a relationship with the person I’m shooting - then it’s more of a collaborative effort and seeing where it goes, rather than having a solid thing that I am looking for. I feel that this is how your best images come out, at least for myself. 

what else inspires you?

Travel. People. Music. I’m really inspired by music. Most of my shoots I have music playing. I get inspired by certain songs I’m listening to, certain bands. And then I find myself starting from there.

what music are you listening to?

Right now I’m listening to Cat Stevens. He’s really good to listen to on the subway. Nurses, they’re a band from Portland and they’re great.

have you had any crazy experiences happen to you here yet?

No! Wait, no, actually that’s a lie, I had a run-in with the cops the other day. They’re getting the loft out next to mine. I heard the workers start to fight, and it sounded like someone was dying, so I called the cops. Everyone was fine though, and it wasn’t a big deal. Citizens looking out for other citizens.

was there ever a photograph you never took? something you wished you had taken, but didn’t, for any reason at all?

Not any in particular that I feel really strongly about, but I do remember driving to Santa Cruz in California one time, and there was a cowboy outside his truck. It was the cutest thing, he was painting the mountains. I wish I had that photo, but more for my personal archive, not so much to share with people.

do you have any interest in filmmaking?

I do, actually, I wouldn’t day that I have any work that I would show professionally, but it is something that I would like to dabble into in the future, definitely,

what is your favourite thing about being a photographer?

Being able to explore and meet new people.

how about least favourite?

The business part of it. It makes me so uncomfortable. 

what has been the most surreal moment of your life so far?

Being able to live freely in terms of pursuing my dreams, and not being shaped by others, not feeling trapped by what others think I should do, and just going for what I want.

if you were a ghost, who would you haunt?

Probably The Beatles, that would be amazing. I think I would just follow them around on tour, and watch them grow as artists.

what do you like to do outside of photography?

I don’t know, my life is so absorbed with it. Walking around, hanging out with friends, talking, travelling - which kind of goes hand in hand with photography, I guess.

website // tumblr // instagram

Margot Gabel
where are you from? I am from Strasbourg, in the East of France. A human scale city I miss a lot…
where are you right now? In the lovely Amsterdam, since two months for a webdesign internship. & sure, it is the ideal city, the right balance between the huge Paris where I lived before and the tiny Strasbourg where I grow up, I love it!
where do you want to be? into deep space, because after all, Earth is becoming boring…
website // flickr // twitter
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Margot Gabel
where are you from? I am from Strasbourg, in the East of France. A human scale city I miss a lot…
where are you right now? In the lovely Amsterdam, since two months for a webdesign internship. & sure, it is the ideal city, the right balance between the huge Paris where I lived before and the tiny Strasbourg where I grow up, I love it!
where do you want to be? into deep space, because after all, Earth is becoming boring…
website // flickr // twitter
ZoomInfo
Margot Gabel
where are you from? I am from Strasbourg, in the East of France. A human scale city I miss a lot…
where are you right now? In the lovely Amsterdam, since two months for a webdesign internship. & sure, it is the ideal city, the right balance between the huge Paris where I lived before and the tiny Strasbourg where I grow up, I love it!
where do you want to be? into deep space, because after all, Earth is becoming boring…
website // flickr // twitter
ZoomInfo
Margot Gabel
where are you from? I am from Strasbourg, in the East of France. A human scale city I miss a lot…
where are you right now? In the lovely Amsterdam, since two months for a webdesign internship. & sure, it is the ideal city, the right balance between the huge Paris where I lived before and the tiny Strasbourg where I grow up, I love it!
where do you want to be? into deep space, because after all, Earth is becoming boring…
website // flickr // twitter
ZoomInfo
Margot Gabel
where are you from? I am from Strasbourg, in the East of France. A human scale city I miss a lot…
where are you right now? In the lovely Amsterdam, since two months for a webdesign internship. & sure, it is the ideal city, the right balance between the huge Paris where I lived before and the tiny Strasbourg where I grow up, I love it!
where do you want to be? into deep space, because after all, Earth is becoming boring…
website // flickr // twitter
ZoomInfo
Margot Gabel
where are you from? I am from Strasbourg, in the East of France. A human scale city I miss a lot…
where are you right now? In the lovely Amsterdam, since two months for a webdesign internship. & sure, it is the ideal city, the right balance between the huge Paris where I lived before and the tiny Strasbourg where I grow up, I love it!
where do you want to be? into deep space, because after all, Earth is becoming boring…
website // flickr // twitter
ZoomInfo
Margot Gabel
where are you from? I am from Strasbourg, in the East of France. A human scale city I miss a lot…
where are you right now? In the lovely Amsterdam, since two months for a webdesign internship. & sure, it is the ideal city, the right balance between the huge Paris where I lived before and the tiny Strasbourg where I grow up, I love it!
where do you want to be? into deep space, because after all, Earth is becoming boring…
website // flickr // twitter
ZoomInfo
Margot Gabel
where are you from? I am from Strasbourg, in the East of France. A human scale city I miss a lot…
where are you right now? In the lovely Amsterdam, since two months for a webdesign internship. & sure, it is the ideal city, the right balance between the huge Paris where I lived before and the tiny Strasbourg where I grow up, I love it!
where do you want to be? into deep space, because after all, Earth is becoming boring…
website // flickr // twitter
ZoomInfo
Margot Gabel
where are you from? I am from Strasbourg, in the East of France. A human scale city I miss a lot…
where are you right now? In the lovely Amsterdam, since two months for a webdesign internship. & sure, it is the ideal city, the right balance between the huge Paris where I lived before and the tiny Strasbourg where I grow up, I love it!
where do you want to be? into deep space, because after all, Earth is becoming boring…
website // flickr // twitter
ZoomInfo
Margot Gabel
where are you from? I am from Strasbourg, in the East of France. A human scale city I miss a lot…
where are you right now? In the lovely Amsterdam, since two months for a webdesign internship. & sure, it is the ideal city, the right balance between the huge Paris where I lived before and the tiny Strasbourg where I grow up, I love it!
where do you want to be? into deep space, because after all, Earth is becoming boring…
website // flickr // twitter
ZoomInfo

Margot Gabel

where are you from? I am from Strasbourg, in the East of France. A human scale city I miss a lot…

where are you right now? In the lovely Amsterdam, since two months for a webdesign internship. & sure, it is the ideal city, the right balance between the huge Paris where I lived before and the tiny Strasbourg where I grow up, I love it!

where do you want to be? into deep space, because after all, Earth is becoming boring…

website // flickr // twitter

Alejandro Meola is an engaging, eloquent individual, and absolutely incredible live (saw him play the same weekend as this interview was recorded). Keep reading to find out about haunted recording rooms, gospel Sundays, and locksmith characters. 
Watch the video for the latest single of Alejandro Meola & Robinsones -  ”Black Feathered Angels” here

where are you from?

I’m from Buenos Aires, Argentina. I was born here - in Miami, Florida, but I was raised in Buenos Aires for pretty much my whole life, and now I moved to New York. 

in what way did growing up in Buenos Aires shape you?

I lived there for twenty five years, so absolutely - in many ways, the people, the streets, everything. I definitely have Buenos Aires in me, in every step that I take. If tomorrow I start singing in, say, Russian, it will still be Buenos Aires. As every place that you spend a lot of time in - especially those formative years - it has been a huge influence on me.

why New York?

It’s a very nice place to be for music. To do music, there’s a lot of things happening, the scene is very nice, it’s a great place to be for that. It was a decision that I had made a while ago, and I had some records going on in Buenos Aires. So when I was finished with them, I just packed the bags, and came here. One way ticket and all. I was curious about the city, too, it was magnetic, I had to come and check it out.

and what was the first thing you did when you came here?

I went to Harlem to hear a gospel. I loved it, it was the number one thing on my list. Actually, it was the only one thing on my list. It’s very early in the morning on Sunday, and it was just, wow, amazing.

when did you first start getting into music?

Very young. I must have been about 12 years old. I found a guitar under the bed, and I was so curious about it. I took it, and I started strumming it with a coin - at the time, I wasn’t even aware what a pick was. And I never let it go from there, it has been with me ever since.

so when you were a kid, did you want to be a musician, or were there ever other fantasies - astronaut, Spiderman, and such?

I definitely wanted to be an astronaut, I think that was the first. But music was there, too. Whether it was good or bad, I don’t know, but it was like a reflex - I started, and eventually, as you grow up, it grows up with you. And one day you realize that you’ve been doing this thing for fourteen, fifteen years. It’s your thing. 

do you think in Spanish, English, or both?

Right now, both. It depends. If I get too angry, I definitely speak in Spanish. I’ve been in New York for almost a year and a half, and at the moment I think pretty much completely in English. I’m writing songs in English, and I think it has to do with the environment. Writing songs, at some level, is like being a sponge - you absorb from your surroundings. All the songs I’ve written in the last year are in English, and it has a lot to do with thinking in it. I have my Spanish records from back in Buenos Aires, and I think that this is a nice cycle going on, and a different one beginning.

do you like performing in venues, or do you busk on the streets, or subways as well?

No, I’m doing venues. We played in Rockwood Music Hall recently, and it was fantastic. It’s a nice place, it’s very crowded. We did the Paper Box as well, that was nice. Now in the summer, we’re doing a series of shows, and I’m getting to know all these venues - a lot of them, my first time seeing them is when I actually go to play. I’m still getting around. So far my favourite has been Rockwood.

how would you describe your sound to someone who has never heard a single song of yours?

I think it’s very blues-y, a mix of rock and blues for sure, and very melodic. Very song format, clear melodies. Very straightforward.

who are your biggest influences? who do you listen to?

Ray Charles, B.B. King, Ella Fitzgerald, Etta James. Also, I grew up being a major fan of Oasis - I was super into it, that type of fanatism that you have when you are a teenager, just once in your life. The Doors. The Beatles. The Velvet Underground. Dylan is one of my favourites. Neil Young, Tom Petty. It’s a very big map, but I’m pretty much listening to the same 300 songs, they suit any mood I have. But also, literature is very important to me as an influence. Ray Bradbury, Kurt Vonnegut, I love them. It’s all over the place, it’s very hard to list influences.

out of those 300 songs, are there any embarrassing ones that you wouldn’t want people to know you listen to?

I would have to check, I haven’t thought about it. Maybe, taste is relative. It happens to me every now and then, I will be listening to a song from the fifties that I think is absolutely amazing, and someone would be.. No, actually, no - I really like all the songs I listen to, and if somebody doesn’t like them, I will confuse the guy, I will prove to him that they’re good. I’m very proud of all of them.

describe your songwriting process.

It’s very fast. I’m very symbiotic with music and lyrics, they come at the same time. It’s very rare that I start with one and then I sit down again in two weeks and try to reconnect with the idea. It starts with a melody that has a word or two in it already, and from there, you pull the string, get it out, write the lyrics. That’s the raw stuff though, the rough draft, or the sketch - and once you have that, you need to spend more hours thinking how to develop that idea. The producing aspect takes me a week, ten days to be happy with it - but the original kickstart is a melody, just walking in the street, and you start mumbling this melody with a couple words in it, wherever they come from. 

has there ever been a weird gig? something that didn’t come out right, or was just odd?

I do remember one story. It wasn’t a gig, but once in the same rehearsal several things happened. The drummer lost the cymbals before he came in. Then the rhythm guitar player opens his case and the guitar was broken. And when I called the rehearsal off, my guitar broke down as well. This all happens within a half an hour period. So all of us were there, thinking, what is happening, what is the energy of this place? The bass player was the only one who hadn’t had any trouble, and he was saying, “Hey man, I’m driving, why don’t I smash the bass against the wall or something, or I’m going to die in the street or something.” I talked to the owner of the place, I told him, “you have to do something, bring a priest, I don’t know.” Weird vibes. But after the whole thing a good friend of mine who knew what was going on knocked on my door and gave me a guitar as a present. Brand new beautiful guitar, and I’m using it still.

tell me about the music video shoot. was it the first one you’ve done in New York?

In New York, yeah. I met Morgan, the director, and he’s from France, and he studied here in a film school in Brooklyn. I met him in a bar when I was doing a gig with the band. We started talking, and I knew that by February-March I would have the recording done, and that eventually we would want to have a video as well. I sent an e-mail to him, thinking we would do a low-key video on a low-key budget. He replied to me with a screenplay. “Hey, you know, I have a lot of cameras, and lights, and all that stuff from my school.” And the day of the shooting, he comes with all this gear, and an amazing crew of like, 25 people. It was fantastic, it was like a film set. We shot it in a warehouse, on 16mm. It’s amazing, you meet someone, you just click, and the idea doubles up, grows to the level that you originally didn’t even have in mind. Also, the acting is hard for me. You have a camera in your face, and you’re singing - when you’r just playing music, it’s cool, because it’s what you do - but when you have to be more actor-y in a way, it gets tricky. 

what has been the most surreal moment of your life?

I would say that one, the one I was telling you, the rehearsal. Very surreal, surreal enough. 

favourite thing about being a musician?

Many things. What I like most is the fact that, and I think any artist has the same thing, wether he is a painter, a writer, or - as a musician, you are able to make these recordings, and they are like bubbles, bubbles of time. It’s like a photo - you take it, and it is there, and it will remain like that over the years. You create a time capsule. Even if you change, if a lot of things change around you, that is going to stay fixed, and you are at that point in your life inside that time capsule.

and the least favourite?

Maybe the struggle? But I like it, too. It depends on the day, it depends on the mood. It takes a lot of endurance, and that’s what, in the long run, makes or breaks musicians - and really, all artists. 

tell me about your band.

I met all the guys here, but I’ve always been playing with a band. I never did the acoustic singer-songwriter, even though I love it - but I felt the songs needed more, some rock, electric, two-three guitars, I couldn’t put it together with just one acoustic guitar. 

and why the name, the Robinsones?

It’s something that I read in a book a long time ago. I remember thinking at the time, “Oh, this is a great name for a band. Eventually, in a couple of years, that will be a nice way to go.” It’s been seven years since I have started with this project, and there has always been a band, and the band needed a name. But in the end, whether it’s a band or a solo project, it comes down to five guys talking to each other on the stage. It’s a social thing to play music for me, you’re talking a lot.

do you get nervous before playing on stage?

Yes, I get a kick, this rush before getting up. I really hope not to ever lose it. When that happens, it means you’re getting bored, or that what you’re playing doesn’t move you. You’re exposing yourself to another person, a group of people, so there’s always a mix of things, a mix of feelings. But once you’re on stage, you just play, you forget about everything. That’s the best time in the world, when you’re playing on stage, live.

what would be your spirit animal?

Tiger. I like them, they’re very fierce and strong. Talking about endurance and all, I don’t see tigers pulling back.

outside of music, what do you like to do?

I read a lot, and eventually, it would be nice to sit down and write. I love writing songs, but it’s a very narrow space for writing, I can’t really write paragraphs. I like the idea of not thinking about melody or rhyme, and just writing freely, but I think it takes time. I don’t know if this is true or not, but for me, I feel that you need to know a little bit of everything in order to write. Say, you have a character, this guy, and he’s a locksmith. You have to know what a locksmith does, and how he does it. Those things take time. I take music very seriously, but I would like to do writing as a side thing, just for me, private.

who would you want to open for?

The Black Keys, that would be amazing. Noel Gallagher. That would be a full circle. Smokey Robinson. Any of the big blues guys really, that would be such a privilege.

imagine three, four hundred years from now, people find just one song of yours, and it’s the only thing they know you by. what do you reckon they’ll think of it?

I hope that it will show them a period of time, a certain person living and trying to express it in a song. I think that would be a nice thing in three hundred years - okay, this guy was here, in this city, in this time, and he wrote this, why? Those questions that may pop up in their head.

website // twitter // bandcamp // instagram // facebook // youtube
_________
*photo by Carlos Detres
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Alejandro Meola is an engaging, eloquent individual, and absolutely incredible live (saw him play the same weekend as this interview was recorded). Keep reading to find out about haunted recording rooms, gospel Sundays, and locksmith characters. 

Watch the video for the latest single of Alejandro Meola & Robinsones -  ”Black Feathered Angels” here

where are you from?

I’m from Buenos Aires, Argentina. I was born here - in Miami, Florida, but I was raised in Buenos Aires for pretty much my whole life, and now I moved to New York. 

in what way did growing up in Buenos Aires shape you?

I lived there for twenty five years, so absolutely - in many ways, the people, the streets, everything. I definitely have Buenos Aires in me, in every step that I take. If tomorrow I start singing in, say, Russian, it will still be Buenos Aires. As every place that you spend a lot of time in - especially those formative years - it has been a huge influence on me.

why New York?

It’s a very nice place to be for music. To do music, there’s a lot of things happening, the scene is very nice, it’s a great place to be for that. It was a decision that I had made a while ago, and I had some records going on in Buenos Aires. So when I was finished with them, I just packed the bags, and came here. One way ticket and all. I was curious about the city, too, it was magnetic, I had to come and check it out.

and what was the first thing you did when you came here?

I went to Harlem to hear a gospel. I loved it, it was the number one thing on my list. Actually, it was the only one thing on my list. It’s very early in the morning on Sunday, and it was just, wow, amazing.

when did you first start getting into music?

Very young. I must have been about 12 years old. I found a guitar under the bed, and I was so curious about it. I took it, and I started strumming it with a coin - at the time, I wasn’t even aware what a pick was. And I never let it go from there, it has been with me ever since.

so when you were a kid, did you want to be a musician, or were there ever other fantasies - astronaut, Spiderman, and such?

I definitely wanted to be an astronaut, I think that was the first. But music was there, too. Whether it was good or bad, I don’t know, but it was like a reflex - I started, and eventually, as you grow up, it grows up with you. And one day you realize that you’ve been doing this thing for fourteen, fifteen years. It’s your thing. 

do you think in Spanish, English, or both?

Right now, both. It depends. If I get too angry, I definitely speak in Spanish. I’ve been in New York for almost a year and a half, and at the moment I think pretty much completely in English. I’m writing songs in English, and I think it has to do with the environment. Writing songs, at some level, is like being a sponge - you absorb from your surroundings. All the songs I’ve written in the last year are in English, and it has a lot to do with thinking in it. I have my Spanish records from back in Buenos Aires, and I think that this is a nice cycle going on, and a different one beginning.

do you like performing in venues, or do you busk on the streets, or subways as well?

No, I’m doing venues. We played in Rockwood Music Hall recently, and it was fantastic. It’s a nice place, it’s very crowded. We did the Paper Box as well, that was nice. Now in the summer, we’re doing a series of shows, and I’m getting to know all these venues - a lot of them, my first time seeing them is when I actually go to play. I’m still getting around. So far my favourite has been Rockwood.

how would you describe your sound to someone who has never heard a single song of yours?

I think it’s very blues-y, a mix of rock and blues for sure, and very melodic. Very song format, clear melodies. Very straightforward.

who are your biggest influences? who do you listen to?

Ray Charles, B.B. King, Ella Fitzgerald, Etta James. Also, I grew up being a major fan of Oasis - I was super into it, that type of fanatism that you have when you are a teenager, just once in your life. The Doors. The Beatles. The Velvet Underground. Dylan is one of my favourites. Neil Young, Tom Petty. It’s a very big map, but I’m pretty much listening to the same 300 songs, they suit any mood I have. But also, literature is very important to me as an influence. Ray Bradbury, Kurt Vonnegut, I love them. It’s all over the place, it’s very hard to list influences.

out of those 300 songs, are there any embarrassing ones that you wouldn’t want people to know you listen to?

I would have to check, I haven’t thought about it. Maybe, taste is relative. It happens to me every now and then, I will be listening to a song from the fifties that I think is absolutely amazing, and someone would be.. No, actually, no - I really like all the songs I listen to, and if somebody doesn’t like them, I will confuse the guy, I will prove to him that they’re good. I’m very proud of all of them.

describe your songwriting process.

It’s very fast. I’m very symbiotic with music and lyrics, they come at the same time. It’s very rare that I start with one and then I sit down again in two weeks and try to reconnect with the idea. It starts with a melody that has a word or two in it already, and from there, you pull the string, get it out, write the lyrics. That’s the raw stuff though, the rough draft, or the sketch - and once you have that, you need to spend more hours thinking how to develop that idea. The producing aspect takes me a week, ten days to be happy with it - but the original kickstart is a melody, just walking in the street, and you start mumbling this melody with a couple words in it, wherever they come from. 

has there ever been a weird gig? something that didn’t come out right, or was just odd?

I do remember one story. It wasn’t a gig, but once in the same rehearsal several things happened. The drummer lost the cymbals before he came in. Then the rhythm guitar player opens his case and the guitar was broken. And when I called the rehearsal off, my guitar broke down as well. This all happens within a half an hour period. So all of us were there, thinking, what is happening, what is the energy of this place? The bass player was the only one who hadn’t had any trouble, and he was saying, “Hey man, I’m driving, why don’t I smash the bass against the wall or something, or I’m going to die in the street or something.” I talked to the owner of the place, I told him, “you have to do something, bring a priest, I don’t know.” Weird vibes. But after the whole thing a good friend of mine who knew what was going on knocked on my door and gave me a guitar as a present. Brand new beautiful guitar, and I’m using it still.

tell me about the music video shoot. was it the first one you’ve done in New York?

In New York, yeah. I met Morgan, the director, and he’s from France, and he studied here in a film school in Brooklyn. I met him in a bar when I was doing a gig with the band. We started talking, and I knew that by February-March I would have the recording done, and that eventually we would want to have a video as well. I sent an e-mail to him, thinking we would do a low-key video on a low-key budget. He replied to me with a screenplay. “Hey, you know, I have a lot of cameras, and lights, and all that stuff from my school.” And the day of the shooting, he comes with all this gear, and an amazing crew of like, 25 people. It was fantastic, it was like a film set. We shot it in a warehouse, on 16mm. It’s amazing, you meet someone, you just click, and the idea doubles up, grows to the level that you originally didn’t even have in mind. Also, the acting is hard for me. You have a camera in your face, and you’re singing - when you’r just playing music, it’s cool, because it’s what you do - but when you have to be more actor-y in a way, it gets tricky. 

what has been the most surreal moment of your life?

I would say that one, the one I was telling you, the rehearsal. Very surreal, surreal enough. 

favourite thing about being a musician?

Many things. What I like most is the fact that, and I think any artist has the same thing, wether he is a painter, a writer, or - as a musician, you are able to make these recordings, and they are like bubbles, bubbles of time. It’s like a photo - you take it, and it is there, and it will remain like that over the years. You create a time capsule. Even if you change, if a lot of things change around you, that is going to stay fixed, and you are at that point in your life inside that time capsule.

and the least favourite?

Maybe the struggle? But I like it, too. It depends on the day, it depends on the mood. It takes a lot of endurance, and that’s what, in the long run, makes or breaks musicians - and really, all artists. 

tell me about your band.

I met all the guys here, but I’ve always been playing with a band. I never did the acoustic singer-songwriter, even though I love it - but I felt the songs needed more, some rock, electric, two-three guitars, I couldn’t put it together with just one acoustic guitar. 

and why the name, the Robinsones?

It’s something that I read in a book a long time ago. I remember thinking at the time, “Oh, this is a great name for a band. Eventually, in a couple of years, that will be a nice way to go.” It’s been seven years since I have started with this project, and there has always been a band, and the band needed a name. But in the end, whether it’s a band or a solo project, it comes down to five guys talking to each other on the stage. It’s a social thing to play music for me, you’re talking a lot.

do you get nervous before playing on stage?

Yes, I get a kick, this rush before getting up. I really hope not to ever lose it. When that happens, it means you’re getting bored, or that what you’re playing doesn’t move you. You’re exposing yourself to another person, a group of people, so there’s always a mix of things, a mix of feelings. But once you’re on stage, you just play, you forget about everything. That’s the best time in the world, when you’re playing on stage, live.

what would be your spirit animal?

Tiger. I like them, they’re very fierce and strong. Talking about endurance and all, I don’t see tigers pulling back.

outside of music, what do you like to do?

I read a lot, and eventually, it would be nice to sit down and write. I love writing songs, but it’s a very narrow space for writing, I can’t really write paragraphs. I like the idea of not thinking about melody or rhyme, and just writing freely, but I think it takes time. I don’t know if this is true or not, but for me, I feel that you need to know a little bit of everything in order to write. Say, you have a character, this guy, and he’s a locksmith. You have to know what a locksmith does, and how he does it. Those things take time. I take music very seriously, but I would like to do writing as a side thing, just for me, private.

who would you want to open for?

The Black Keys, that would be amazing. Noel Gallagher. That would be a full circle. Smokey Robinson. Any of the big blues guys really, that would be such a privilege.

imagine three, four hundred years from now, people find just one song of yours, and it’s the only thing they know you by. what do you reckon they’ll think of it?

I hope that it will show them a period of time, a certain person living and trying to express it in a song. I think that would be a nice thing in three hundred years - okay, this guy was here, in this city, in this time, and he wrote this, why? Those questions that may pop up in their head.

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*photo by Carlos Detres